6 Best Fish Finder Transducer Mounts: Reviewed & Compared

by Andrew

6 Best Fish Finder Transducer Mounts: Reviewed & Compared

by Andrew

by Andrew

While casual fishing calls for little more than a pole setup and bait, most anglers know investing in key equipment like a quality fish finder can make any fishing trip much more productive. A related—yet often overlooked—component is your fish finder transducer mount.  

In this buyers’ guide, you’ll learn why a fish finder transducer mount is important, the must-have qualities you should consider before purchasing one, and the answers to frequently asked questions about transducer mounts.  

Preview

Product

Material

Mounting Style

Size

Check Price

Lowrance 000-10262-001 Skimmer Transducer...

Lowrance Skimmer 000-10262-001

Plastic

Transom or trolling motor mount

3.8”x7.5”x1.25”

Garmin 0101200611 Heavy Duty Transom Mount...

Garmin 010-12006-11

Stainless steel

Transom mount

3”x3”x7”

YakAttack Switchblade Transducer Deployment...

YakAttack Switchblade

Composite

Track system

15”8”x2.5”

Brocraft Universal Portable Transducer...

Brocraft Universal Portable Mount

Aluminum

Front/rear (pontoon)

39.4”5”x2.6”

HawkEye ACC-FF-1789 Suction Cup Transducer...

HawkEye ACC-FF-1789

Plastic

Hull (external)

2”x1.5”x2”

Minn Kota 1840201 MKR-15 Transducer Mount Kit

Johnson Outdoors Minn Kota MKR-15

Composite/mixed

Trolling motor mount

9”x8”x2”


Why Your Transducer Mounting System Matters When Finding Fish  

Your fish finder’s transducer is the sonar that delivers information to the device. Without a proper mounting system in place, that transducer can’t get an accurate reading of the surrounding waters.  

Simply put, this means your fish finder won’t be able to find fish. What’s more, it won’t give you readouts on the underwater contours. Rocks, logs, and other obstacles that could snag your lines (or worse, damage your watercraft) can go unnoticed. Meanwhile, promising areas where you should be casting will glide right on by.  

All mounting systems are not created equal. Some are better suited for kayaks versus large boats; others perform well at low speeds but can break the second you hit the gas. And even a high-quality, top-notch mount is useless if it doesn’t fit your boat and transducer type, because you still won’t be getting accurate readings.  

A transducer must be placed at the correct angle in the water to send out its sonar and read the subsequent echoes when those waves bounce off the nearby fish. This is where great fish finder transducer mounts shine—they hold the transducer in place, diminish turbulence, and ensure that sonar gets where it needs to. Without a sturdy and reliable mount, your readings can’t be trusted.  


Factors to Consider When Buying Transducer Mounts For Fish Finders  

Compatibility with Transducer

Your transducer type is primarily dictated by what kind of vessel you’re operating and how you plan to fish. Trolling anglers, for example, might want a transducer to mount to their motor and would therefore need a completely different mounting system than anglers fishing from a kayak. The fish finder transducer mounts you choose should be compatible with your transducer type—which, ideally, will be compatible with your vessel.   

Quality Construction/Material

Fish finder transducer mounts come in a variety of materials such as plastic, stainless steel, and aluminum. While it’s true a material like steel will hold up better than plastic, that doesn’t mean steel is always the way to go. More than anything, that depends on the kind of fishing you’ll do, your hull type, and the waters you’ll be traversing. Furthermore, construction matters: a well-made plastic mount can easily outlast a poorly-built steel version. 

Corrosion Resistance

Saltwater is the main culprit for corrosion on boating or fishing accessories, but freshwater can deliver rust and grime just the same. Ensure the mount you purchase for your fish finder's transducer will resist the elements with proper care. 

Ease of Use & Installation

If you’re uncomfortable drilling or cutting holes in your hull (as many boat owners are), that will influence the kind of mounting system you purchase. On the other hand, if you hate the idea of having to adjust clamps or potentially losing your mount in the water, a more permanent drilled-in system might be ideal. Before you buy, make sure the installation process fits your skill level—and your willingness. 

Mounting Style & Location

Most of this depends upon your hull and how you’ll be fishing, but your comfort level comes into play, too, just as it would with the installation process. Some mounting systems get drilled to the stern, while others go through the hull or on a trolling motor. If you already have an ideal mount location in mind, make sure the system you purchase is designed to fit that. 

Adaptability

Some mounts have a high degree of compatibility with various transducers and types of watercraft, while others are designed to accommodate highly specific setups.  

Brand Reliability

Note that this isn’t the same as “brand recognition.” Simply put, you don’t have to stick to big brand names to find quality fishing gear. The brand you buy from, however big or small it may be, should be known for great customer service and high-caliber products you can feel confident purchasing.

Price & Warranty

Finding a great transducer mount for your fish finder can be a delicate balancing act between your wants…and your wallet. The good news, however, is that the market’s filled with excellent, budget-friendly mounting systems. Another factor to consider before you purchase is whether or not a fish finder transducer mount comes with a warranty. Not only will this guarantee your investment should a problem arise, but it’s also one sign of a reputable brand. 


6 Best Fish Finder Transducer Mounts Reviewed  

1. Lowrance Skimmer 000-10262-001

Best Transducer Mount for Fish Finder 

Material 

Plastic 

Corrosion Resistant? 

Yes  

Mounting Style 

Transom or trolling motor mount 

Drilling Required? 

Yes 

Compatible Transducers 

Down Scan Imaging transducer 

Size 

3.8”x7.5”x1.25” 

As the best transducer mount overall, the Lowrance Skimmer is compatible with Down Scan Imaging (DSI) transducers, which deliver readings of activity and topography below your boat. There’s also an optional adapter so you can mount your transducer to a trolling motor.  This versatility puts the Lowrance Skimmer above several competitors with more limited functions. 

While the mount itself is plastic, it’s extremely durable and will resist corrosion from saltwater, sun, and more.  The plastic element is designed to break away upon heavy impact so that the stainless steel bracket will not tear off your vessel and cause damage to the hull.  

Installation couldn’t be simpler, whether you’re adding a transducer mount for the first time or just replacing a broken or corroded one. All the hardware you need is included to mount the Skimmer to your transom or fit it to your trolling motor—though minor adjustments may be needed to ensure it’s stable, which is often true of trolling mounts.  

Pros
  • Affordable 
  • Easy installation 
  • Adaptable to most transducers 
  • Hardware included 
  • Durable construction 
Cons
  • Not as strong as metal mounts 

2. Garmin 010-12006-11

Best Transom Fish Finding Mounting System 

Material 

Stainless steel 

Corrosion Resistant? 

Yes  

Mounting Style 

Transom mount 

Drilling Required? 

Yes 

Compatible Transducers 

4/8/12-pin transducers 

Size 

3”x3”x7” 

The same trustworthy brand behind countless GPS and fish finder innovations delivers impeccable quality yet again with this transom mount. Constructed from heavy-duty steel, there’s no doubt this mounting system will keep your fish finder transducer exactly where you place it, even when turbulent waters roll in.  

While it’s compatible with Garmin brand transducers, the mounting system will also fit any transducers with cables containing 4, 8, or 12 pins for contact with the fish finder. This adaptability, as well as its durable construction, makes it one of the best transom mounts available. In fact, several reviewers purchase it as a replacement to the plastic stock mounts included with their Garmin transducers.  

This Garmin mounting system also incorporates a spray shield into its design, which reduces the water spraying off the transducer when traveling at higher speeds—a simple but invaluable addition to avoid the “rooster tail” effect of unshielded transducers.  

Pros
  • Extremely sturdy/durable 
  • Compatible with many transducers 
  • Easy to install 
  • Affordable 
  • Spray shield design 
Cons
  • Pricier than plastic models 

3. YakAttack Switchblade

Best Kayak Fish Finder Transducer Mount 

Material 

Composite 

Corrosion Resistant? 

Yes  

Mounting Style 

Track system 

Drilling Required? 

No 

Compatible Transducers 

Garmin, Lowrance, Humminbird, etc. 

Size 

15”8”x2.5” 

An innovative and popular brand among kayak anglers, YakAttack devotes their company to delivering smart designs and much-needed solutions for gaps in the kayak fishing market. Their products are made for anglers, by anglers—so they understand that every last piece of equipment in such a limiting vessel must be highly functional, minimally invasive, and of the utmost quality.  

The Yak Attack Switchblade is incredibly adaptable, both in terms of the track systems it fits into (virtually all factory-installed versions, as well as several after-market configurations) and the transducers with which it’s compatible. Transducers for Garmin, Lowrance, and several other popular fish finder brands should work beautifully with the Switchblade, and adjustment is much simpler than similar kayak transducer mounts.  

Although its price is higher than many bargain kayak transducer mounts out there, the YakAttack Switchblade is still a highly affordable mid-range option. What’s more, its durability and ease of adjustment make up for those extra dollars.  

Pros
  • Easy installation 
  • Depth adjustable 
  • Adapts to most track systems 
  • Universal 
  • Hardware included 
Cons
  • Not compatible with all tracks 

4. Brocraft Universal Portable Mount

Brocraft Universal Portable Mount 

Material 

Aluminum 

Corrosion Resistant? 

Yes  

Mounting Style 

Front/rear (pontoon) 

Drilling Required? 

No 

Compatible Transducers 

Universal; most brands 

Size 

39.4”5”x2.6” 

As another respected and popular brand among anglers, Brocraft offers this impressive option for pontoon owners: their transducer mount is removable and quickly repositioned with an easy-to-operate clamp system. Unlike transom mounts on typical hulls, the Brocraft Universal Mount is intended for use on the front of your pontoon, although mounting it to the rear can work just as well.  

Its 360-degree swivel mount is universal to major brands like Lowrance, Eagle, Garmin, and more.  The clamp boasts a pretty hefty maximum opening size of 2¾" that will fit most pontoon walls easily. While very thin vessel walls might require shimming to get a snug fit, keep in mind that the same is true of most clamp-style transducer mounts.   

At just under 2.5 pounds and crafted from marine-grade aluminum, this highly portable option delivers functionality and simplicity to pontoon anglers that make it well worth its price.  

Pros
  • Universal fit 
  • Designed for pontoons 
  • Lightweight 
  • Portable/removable 
  • 360-degree swivel mount 
Cons
  • Higher price point 

5. HawkEye ACC-FF-1789

Best No Drill Transducer Mount for Fish Finders 

Material 

Plastic 

Corrosion Resistant? 

Yes  

Mounting Style 

Hull (external) 

Drilling Required? 

No 

Compatible Transducers 

FishTrax; most other brands 

Size 

2”x1.5”x2” 

If the thought of drilling into your boat’s hull makes you cringe, the HawkEye transducer mount might be the perfect product to meet your needs. It attaches with a suction cup to any non-porous surface, making installing—as well as adjustments—exceedingly simple. Just affix it to the hull of your vessel.  If test readings are less than ideal, repositioning can be done in mere seconds to achieve better accuracy.  

This mount is compatible with any FishTrax transducer, along with most fish finder brands. At only 4 oz., it’s a cinch to stow away when you’re ready to swap your poles for the throttle—though many customers say it handles high speeds just fine without detaching or slipping.  

And if it doesn’t stick to your ship’s hull as well as you’d like, don’t worry: this brand also offers a mounting disk to increase suction power, all without drilling a single hole.  

Pros
  • No drilling required 
  • Easy to install 
  • Inexpensive 
  • Compatible with most brands 
Cons
  • May detach at high speeds 

6. Johnson Outdoors Minn Kota MKR-15

Budget Fish Finder Transducer Mount 

Material 

Composite/mixed 

Corrosion Resistant? 

Yes  

Mounting Style 

Trolling motor mount 

Drilling Required? 

No 

Compatible Transducers 

Most brands 

Size 

9”x8”x2” 

While all the options reviewed here fall in an affordable range, the Minn Kota offers exceptional value for a shockingly low sticker price. Installation is easy and fast using the included hardware.  Simply attach the Minn Kota mount to your trolling motor and adjust as needed. 

Although not universal, this mount is adaptable with several major brands including Humminbird and Garmin, depending on your particular model. Its lightweight aluminum bracket and stainless steel strap marry convenience and resilience that defy the adage, "You get what you pay for."  

In addition to its pleasing price, the Minn Kota offers reliability from a popular brand trusted by anglers for nearly 90 years. As part of the Johnson Outdoors brand family, Minn Kota Motors sits among the ranks of Cannon, Old Town, and Ocean Kayak—just to name a few—so it goes without saying the Minn Kota MKR-15 mounting system was designed with an eye for adaptable function and superior quality while remaining extremely affordable.  

Pros
  • Affordable 
  • Easy to install 
  • Adaptable to most brands 
  • Hardware included 
Cons
  • Not universal 

3 Types of Fish Finder Mounts Compared  

Choosing the best place to mount your transducer—and, by extension, the kind of fish finder mount you should purchase—might seem daunting, with so many options available. Each mount location has its pros and cons, of course, so comparing those can greatly inform your decision.  

Transom Mounting 

A transom is the vertical reinforcement on your boat’s stern. This is where you’ll typically find the motor or rudder, and it’s the most common location to install a fish finder transducer mount.  

One benefit of mounting your transducer to the transom is the ease of installation. Even if the mount requires some drilling, it’s quite simple to position and attach, and those small holes aren’t going to compromise your hull’s waterproofness if done correctly.  

However, transom mounts aren’t without a few issues. If installed in a less-than-ideal spot, air bubbles or turbulence can disturb your readings.  

In-Hull Mounting

This style of transducer mounting is also known as “shoot-through" because the transducer directs its signal through your hull without the need for drilling or holes.  

An obvious pro to this method is the ease of installation and the fact you won’t need to cut into the hull. It’s installed against the inside of your hull instead and doesn't even need to make contact with the water to deliver its signals.  

The con, however, is that those signals are obscured by your hull—which means the echoes will be too. As a result, you might discover the readings on your fish finder aren’t nearly as accurate as other transducer mounting locations.  

You also can’t use this method with most hulls due to their materials, since aluminum, wood, and steel absorb too much of the sonar for usable readings. Even on compatible hull materials, up to 50% of the sonar gets blocked.  

Thru-Hull Mounting 

This mounting method is, by far, the best way to ensure an accurate reading. Like transom mounts, thru-hull mounts make direct contact with the water—but, rather than being positioned at the stern, they’re installed in your hull. Due to its prime location, the transducer can provide readings from directly underneath your boat, giving a more comprehensive reading on nearby fish, depth changes, and the contours of where you’re fishing.  

A downside to thru-hull mounting is that you have to cut a hole in your hull, although if it's done correctly the hull will retain its integrity just fine. Additionally, installing a thru-hull mount requires more know-how than transom or in-hull styles.  


How to Successfully Mount Fish Finder Transducers  

Once you’ve selected the best mounting location for your fish finder transducer, it’s time to install it. While most mounts are simple to attach or install, the process can still get confusing—especially if you’re not familiar with the mount type or don't consider yourself particularly handy with tools.  

Fortunately, successfully mounting your transducer is far less complicated than it looks. Below, you’ll find step-by-step guides to install your transducer mount, no matter what type you’ve chosen.  


Step-by-Step Guide to Install a Transom Mount 

  1. 1
    If needed, assemble your mounting bracket per manufacturer instructions. 
  2. 2
    Choose where to install the mount on your transom. Generally, the mount should sit close to the center, on starboard—wherever your propeller's downward swing is. Transducers should sit 15 inches or more from the propeller and away from strakes, discharge ports, and other elements that can contribute to turbulence or cause interference with readings. 
  3. 3
    While the exact installation process will vary (again, be sure to consult your product’s instructions), you’ll generally mark the area where you plan to mount the bracket, ensuring the transducer will be parallel to the waterline. 
  4. 4
    Drill holes according to your markings, ensuring not to go too deeply as per your hull type. On the appropriate screws/bolts, apply marine-grade epoxy and attach your bracket to the boat. You might decide to forgo epoxy until you’re sure the location is ideal. 
  5. 5
    Route your transducer cable through the transom, if applicable, and use a clamp to keep your cable stabilized once the desired length and positioning have been achieved. Next, route the cable to your fish finder. 
  6. 6
    Test your setup, adjusting as necessary, and seal holes with marine epoxy when you’re satisfied with the readings. 

If you’d prefer a visual step-by-step guide, this tutorial from Garmin can provide helpful tips, as well.  


Thru-Hull Transducer Mount Installation 

  1. 1
    First, choose the best location on the hull to mount your thru-hull transducer. It should be a place where bubbles and turbulence are minimal, allowing the transducer continuous submersion/contact with the water. 
  2. 2
    Drill a pilot hole into your hull, then use a hole saw drill bit (the correct size for your mount) to make a larger hole. To protect your boat’s gelcoat, it can be helpful to score the hole first. Properly sand and clean the hole. 
  3. 3
    If using a fairing block, measure the hull’s deadrise angle. This will help you build a standard fairing block, which keeps the transducer at the angle it will need for accurate readings. 
  4. 4
    If you are not using a fairing block, simply apply marine epoxy/adhesive to the outer lip of the housing, then feed your transducer cable through the hole (from the outside of the hull). Secure the housing snugly in place using a slight twisting motion. 
  5. 5
    Inside the hull, align the arrow or markings on your housing towards your boat’s bow, then slide the gasket over the cable and onto the housing unit. Tighten the nut by hand without moving the arrow/marking on the housing. 
  6. 6
    Remove excess epoxy/adhesive from the outside of your hull. 
  7. 7
    Attach your cable to the fish finder. Before testing your transducer, allow for the appropriate drying/cure times per your epoxy or adhesive instructions. 

This guide from HawkEye can provide a visual step-by-step process for installing your thru-hull transducer mount.  

It’s important to note that thru-hull mount installation can vary based on manufacturer instructions, boat types, and whether or not you’re using a fairing block.  


In-Hull Transducer Mount Installation 

  1. 1
    Prepare the mounting location by cleaning with isopropyl alcohol to remove oils, paint, wax, and other debris that might compromise your installation. If needed, you can sand the location lightly, then clean it with alcohol a second time. Allow to dry. 
  2. 2
    Secure your transducer’s base housing with an appropriate epoxy, following the package’s instructions and cure times. 
  3. 3
    Once curing has completed, pour antifreeze (non-toxic varieties) into the housing, then apply petroleum to your O-ring and place the transducer inside the housing. Align your transducer per the mount’s instructions and secure it with hardware/screws. 
  4. 4
    Route your transducer cable to the fish finder, then test your setup for accuracy and correct installation. 

Note that shoot-thru/in-hull transducer mounting methods vary. Some anglers prefer temporary methods—high-strength tape, for example, rather than marine epoxy—to run their testing phases before committing to a particular setup. For best results, follow your mount manufacturer’s specific instructions. If a visual guide is more helpful, check out this tutorial from Gemeco Marine.  


How to Mount a Fish Finder Transducer on Trolling Motor 

  1. 1
    Using the included hardware with your trolling motor mount (or the appropriately sized screws and washers), attach your mount to the transducer and adjust the angle. Tighten securely. 
  2. 2
    Attach the included hose clamp or a suitable replacement, then attach the mount to the trolling motor between the fin and propeller using the hose clamp and a screwdriver. 
  3. 3
    Route your cables along the motor, taking care to keep it out of the propeller path, securing with cable ties as you go. Finally, connect it to your fish finder and test or make adjustments as needed. 

While installing a trolling motor transducer mount is much simpler than other installations, visual guides can still be helpful. This video on installing a Lowrance Skimmer walks you through the process quickly and clearly.  


How to Install a Transducer Mount Without Drilling Holes 

There are certainly no-drill transducer mounts on the market, such as suction or clamp varieties, but you can also install traditional transom versions without drilling into your boat.  

To accomplish this, you’ll first need to install a mounting plate on your stern. It can be attached with epoxy or secured with some screws above the waterline for extra security without below-water holes in the stern.  

Once your plate is attached, install your mount as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This video from TheSternSaver, a glue-on mount plate producer, can walk you through the process of attaching their plates to both fiberglass and aluminum boats.  


Mounting a Transducer on an Aluminum Boat 

Aluminum boats are popular due to durable construction and affordable prices—but placing a transducer can be a bit limiting. Since its material blocks too much sonar for shoot-thru mounts, a transom installation will be preferable.  

Choose an area with few rivets (if your boat does not have a welded hull) and make sure your transducer is level to the waterline. You might also consider using mounting hardware or a transducer shield to further protect the transducer from damage.  


People Also Ask (FAQs)

How do I protect my fish finder transducer? 

Transducer shields can help, but the real key in protecting your transducer is to install the mount correctly and place the transducer at the best angle so that any impacts—be they rogue branches or less-than-perfect launches—don’t make contact.  

Is it possible to make a DIY fish finder mounting system for kayaks or boats? 

Yes, many anglers have constructed effective and sturdy mounting systems for their vessels with materials like PVC and aluminum. If you’re new to installing mounting systems, however, purchasing a model might be preferable.  

Can you run 2 fish finders off 1 transducer?  

It is possible to run 2 fish finders with the same transducer, but keep in mind you can only use one finder at a time. The same goes for multiple transducers. In fact: trying to use 2 at once can cause too much interference for accurate readings, although some anglers see success running each on a different frequency.  

How close together can you mount transducers?  

You can install transducers right beside each other if you plan on running one at a time/on different frequencies. Some anglers prefer to have one transducer at the bow and another at the stern for broader readings of their surroundings.  

Where can I find quality transducer mounting systems for fish finders? 

For the greatest variety and competitive pricing, Amazon is the best resource. While brick-and-mortar stores carry many of the same options, prices tend to be higher, and several mounts—even from popular brands—won’t be on shelves, thereby limiting your options.  


Conclusion

In the end, the best transducer mount for your fish finder depends on several factors, from hull type to your budget. The overall best fish finder transducer mount is the Lowrance Skimmer due to its high compatibility, durability, and ease of installation. Furthermore, its optional trolling motor adapter gives it a serious edge over transom-only models.  

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