Buyer’s Guide & Information

Best Trolling Motors Reviewed

Looking for the best trolling motor? Our reviews and comparison guide is here to help you get on the water with a safe, reliable trolling motor.

by Andrew

Buyer’s Guide & Information

Best Trolling Motors Reviewed

Looking for the best trolling motor? Our reviews and comparison guide is here to help you get on the water with a safe, reliable trolling motor.

by Andrew

by Andrew

Trolling motors are designed to move you around in your boat without disturbing the fish. An ideal situation when you want to move from one spot to another for a better cast or to hunt down that honey hole.

The best trolling motor will have enough power to move you and your gear, be adaptive for the type of water you are fishing in, and mount in the perfect location for your craft. This article will review, compare and rate the best kayak trolling motors out there.

Preview

Product

Shaft Length

Water Compatibility

Check Price

Minn Kota Endura C2 55 Freshwater Transom...

Minn Kota

Endura Transom

30 Inches

Freshwater

Newport Vessels NV-Series 55lb Thrust...

Newport Vessels

NV-Series

30 inches

Saltwater

MinnKota Edge 45 Bowmount Foot Control...

Minn Kota Edge

Bow Mount

36 inches

Freshwater

Goplus Electric

36 inches

Freshwater

Cloud Mountain Finefind 86LBS Thrust Electric...

Cloud Mountain

28 inches

Freshwater & saltwater

Minn Kota Riptide Terrova a 80 54' Shaft...

Minn Kota

Riptide Terrova

54 inches

Saltwater

MinnKota Traxxis 55 Transom Mount Trolling...

Minn Kota

Traxxis 45

36 inches

Freshwater

MotorGuide 940700120 Xi3 Wireless Freshwater...

MotorGuide 

GPS Attwood

48 inches

Freshwater

Seamax 55 Pound Thrust 32 Inches Shaft 12V...

Seamax 55

32 inches

Freshwater & saltwater


Understanding Trolling Motors

A trolling motor is a small motor powered propeller designed to push or pull your boat and maneuver in tight spaces without disturbing the water. The less you disturb the water, the less likely you are to scare fish.

The trolling motor needs to be a reliable, high-quality model that is dependable in all weather conditions. Because they are electric and not gas-powered, they don’t make a lot of noise.

However, they are susceptible to dead batteries, which can leave you stranded. A high-quality motor will ensure you get where you need to be, efficiently, quietly, and reliably.


Trolling Motor Buying Guide

You have all the gear, your boat, canoe or kayak, and you are ready to buy a trolling motor so you can get out on the water and fish. If you think any trolling motor will work, you would be wrong. Below I offer you several factors that need consideration before you buy the first trolling motor you see.

Fishing Environment

Your fishing locations will have a lot to do with the motor you intend to buy. The first thing to consider is the type of water you are fishing in. Saltwater can wreak havoc on steel and other metals, so you may need to find a saltwater capable motor.

You also need to think about the areas you prefer to fish in. Do you head to the middle of the lake or stay along shores and piers more often?

The motor size and shaft length need to accommodate shallow water or deep water without worry of damage or collisions with underwater rocks and other obstacles.

Boat Size & Type

The boat you attach the motor to will also play a role in determining which model you get. There are two types of trolling motor mounts, either bow or stern. The bow motor needs more power since it is pulling the weight of the boat through the water. Likewise, the stern mounted motor needs to be more agile and forgiving while it pushes the boat around.

Trolling Motor Size

The motor size is categorized in a few different ways, and you need to be aware of all of them. First is the trust power. This is the power the motor has to push or pull your boat through the water. Thrust is measured in pounds, and you should use the basic formula of two pounds of thrust for every 100 pounds of weight.

This weight includes the boat, yourself, your gear, and the trolling motor. Of course, you also need to account for weather conditions, rough waters, high winds, etc. So once you have your estimated weight, add a few more pounds of thrust for the “just in case.”

The next size measurements to take note of are the voltage and speed. The most common motors rely on either 12, 24, or 36 volts to operate. This equates into 1, 2 or 3 car-sized batteries to run the motor. The more voltage you have, the faster the motor is and the more reliable. However, they are also more expensive.

Finally, you need to worry about the shaft length. The shaft needs to be long enough to stay submerged, but short enough to not get caught up or hung in shallows. For the best results, the center of the propeller should be submerged at least a foot. However, your kayak, boat, or canoe trolling motor may require a different length shaft to reach the proper depth.

Mounting Location

You can purchase a trolling motor that attaches to the bow of your craft. These require a bit more thrust power since they are pulling the weight through the water. The other viable option is a transom, or stern mount motor.

These motors push the weight through the water and can be slightly smaller to get the job done. There is a third option, the engine mount. However, for the kayakers and canoeists out there, you may not have an engine to mount the trolling motor to.

If you do have a watercraft with an engine, the engine mount options may be a viable option to investigate, though they tend to be more expensive and offer less control and features.

Motor Steering Style

Trolling motors offer various methods of steering. The most common for fishing crafts are hand and foot controls. The foot pedals allow you to keep your hands on your reel while you steer the boat trolling motor, much like driving a car. They tend to be quite a bit more expensive, though.

Hand controls are cheaper and easier to use in most cases. And depending on which type you get, you also have the option of electronic steering or cable steering. Precision, control, and expense are the difference here, and it is a personal call on your part which one you prefer the most.

Extra Features

Some trolling motors will offer you additional features. This can be anything from extra anti-corrosion coatings to an all-enclosed electrical box. Some motors offer additional sound dampening to make their props even quieter in the water.

You may also find things like vibration dampening, sleeker, smaller designs, or even just having the company throw in extra items like tackle boxes and safety vests.

Price & Warranty

Finally, the price will be a big determining factor, as well. Each motor should be high quality and capable of moving you and your gear around as needed without worry. You will pay more for these assurances, though, which isn’t always a bad thing.

When the quality is high, and the motor's dependability and the brand behind it are good, there will be a warranty to match. Make sure you read the warranty agreement and understand what is covered, what isn’t covered, and what is required of you to make a claim. 


9 Best Trolling Motors Reviewed

1. Minn Kota Endura Transom

Our Top Pick!

Shaft Length

30 Inches

Thrust Options

30 pounds

Voltage

12 volts

Max Amps

30 amps

Water Compatibility

Freshwater

Warranty

2-years

Minn Kota is a name synonymous with quality and durability the world over. Anglers from all skill levels know the brand and trust the name. The best trolling motor for kayaks is the Minn Kota Endura.

This freshwater trolling motor is short enough to keep you in the shallows but strong enough to navigate rough waters or deeper lakes. Ideally in your kayak, you want to get around piers, stay along the shoreline, and access honey holes in areas you can’t reach from the shore.

With 30 pounds of thrust, the Endura C2 55 is strong enough to maneuver kayaks, canoes, and inflatables with a total weight of 1500 pounds. The shaft extends 30 inches, making it perfect for a transom mount without you needing to worry about hitting the bottom.

On top of that, it only requires a 12-volt charge and draws an average of 15amps, though it can draw up to 30 amps. Under regular use, you can expect about two and a half hours of continuous use.

The handheld control uses a 6-inch telescoping handle with twist controls, so you only need one hand to move your kayak. Our top pick is strong enough to go forward and backward with 5 forward speeds and three speeds for reverse.

The 2-year warranty covers defects, workmanship, and the motor. As long as you follow the installation and usage instructions, you won’t have any problems getting your yak in the ideal spot.

Pros
  • Lightweight
  • 5 forward speeds
  • Twist and tilt hand controls
  • Quick clamp installation
  • Perfect for small crafts
Cons
  • Shaft head is not sealed

2. Newport Vessels NV-Series

Best Saltwater Trolling Motor

Shaft Length

30 inches

Thrust Options

36, 46, 55, 62, 86 Lbs.

Voltage

12 volts

Max Amps

50 amps

Water Compatibility

Saltwater

Warranty

2-year

If you like to fish in the sea or other saltwater locations, the best saltwater trolling motor is the Newport Vessels NV-Series. With a complete fiberglass shaft and propeller, along with the powder coated motor housing, this anti-corrosion set up will get you through any saltwater area.

The shaft length is 30 inches, which will fit most kayaks, pontoons, and inflatables and, if mounted on the transom, will even fit most boats. The larger thrust powered motors have longer shafts (up to 36 inches) to accommodate larger watercraft.

The powerful motor runs off of 12-volts, so you only need to bring a single deep cycle marine battery with you. If you are in a pontoon or kayak, this is ideal as it saves you space. However, the controls and wiring may be challenging to mount properly on a canoe.

The Newport Vessels trolling motor is mounted on the transom for best operation. If you want to mount on the bow, you can; however, you will need to watch the depth of the motor. If you run it out of the water, it will increase the amp draw and can burn out the motor faster.

The 2-year warranty covers the motor, shaft, and controls, so you don't have to worry about anything for quite a while. The maintenance schedule is rigorous and must be followed to make a warranty claim, though. Proper care is always advised, but in this case, it is mandatory.

Pros
  • Multiple thrust options
  • Budget-friendly price
  • Adjustable shaft
  • Ideal for offshore seawater fishing
Cons
  • More maintenance required

3. Minn Kota Edge Bow Mount

Best Trolling Motor For Pontoon Boat

Shaft Length

36 inches

Thrust Options

45, 55, 70 Lbs

Voltage

12 volts

Max Amps

30 amps

Water Compatibility

Freshwater

Warranty

Lifetime shaft, 2-year motor

For the angler that prefers to go out on a pontoon boat or other small craft, a bow mount trolling motor is ideal. The best trolling motor for pontoon boats is the Minn Kota Edge. The adjustable shaft is a composite shaft that is guaranteed for life.

While the shaft may be indestructible, the rest of the unit is not. However, it is highly durable, rugged, and with proper care will give you years of reliable use. The mounting is fairly straightforward and simple, and if your pontoon is out of the water, you can have the entire unit mounted and ready to go in about an hour.

The propeller and motor are not coated for saltwater use, and with freshwater fishing, you will be able to go anywhere you need. The 36-inch shaft supports 3 different thrust power motors, including a 45, 55, or 70-pound thrust.

Small and medium pontoons and boats will get the most benefit from this motor, which comes with 7 total speeds and an easily be steered with the included foot pedal. The pedal uses sensitive heel and foot controls for temporary burst, or a full control forward and back drive.

After a bit of practice, you will be able to cast, drive, and reel all at the same time. However, if you are one of the ones that prefer a hands-on approach, there is a 45-pound thrust motor with a handheld control arm. 

Pros
  • Lifetime warranty on composite shaft
  • Adjustable shaft length
  • Heel and foot controls
  • Hand control option available
Cons
  • Requires under-boat mounting

4. Goplus Electric

No products found.

Best Freshwater Trolling Motor

Shaft Length

36 inches

Thrust Options

46, 55, 86 Lbs

Voltage

12 volts (24 volts for 86 lb)

Max Amps

50 amps

Water Compatibility

Freshwater

Warranty

1-year

Goplus Electric brings you the best freshwater trolling motor for your pontoon, aluminum boat, or kayak. Ideally, this motor is bow-mounted but can accommodate a transom as long as the water is deep enough.

The 36-inch fiberglass shaft can take a beating, but you still need to be careful when moving in the shallows. Then prop and motor are housed in aluminum and are susceptible to dents, dings, and breaking.

The hand controls are pull, twist, and tilt, which makes it simple for one-handed controls while your other is on your rod. A 12-volt deep cycle battery powers everything. The one exception is if you decide to upgrade to the 86 lb thrust motor.

The larger motor requires 24 volts, so you will need two batteries in serial connection to run the motor. Otherwise, the 3 thrust options are the same.

Mounting is simple and easily accommodates a fish finder and transducer. You only need to ensure your transducer points face down when the motor is in the water. Otherwise, your readings may be off.

The customer service and warranty here aren’t the best. Making a warranty claim is pretty tricky, so you may have to get your vendor involved to help you get ahold of the company before the warranty period expires. Amazon customer service will help a great deal in these rare situations.

Pros
  • Ideal bow mount for pontoon or aluminum boat
  • Handheld control extends 6 inches
  • Fiberglass shaft
Cons
  • Low limited warranty period
  • Customer service isn’t the best

5. Cloud Mountain

Best Budget Trolling Motor

Shaft Length

28 inches

Thrust Options

30,40,46,50,55,60,86 LBS

Voltage

12 volts (24 volts for 86 Lb motor)

Max Amps

30 - 57 amps

Water Compatibility

Freshwater and saltwater

Warranty

1-year

If you are fishing on a budget, the Cloud Mountain motor is the best budget trolling motor you can find. It offers a lot of thrust power options and configurations, plus it is one of the few motors designed for fresh or saltwater usage.

The most popular motor is the 46 pound thrust model. It is a 12-volt motor, like all of the other options (except the 86 pound) With amp draws between 30 and 57 amps, you can extend the battery life, too, which is always going to come in handy.

You won’t have fancy features here like foot or cable controls. However, the telescoping handle tilts and twists for full, single-handed control.

Cloud Mountain’s trolling motor is made of all stainless steel components, with a fiberglass shaft and aluminum motor casing. Perfect for saltwater trolling or getting around in freshwater.

The only problem with this budget-friendly model is the shaft. It is only 28 inches long, so larger boats, or lighter ones that sit higher will need to be measured before purchase to ensure the prop stays submerged.

Pros
  • Lightweight motor
  • All stainless steel
  • 8-speed motor
Cons
  • Low warranty period
  • Shorter shaft than average

6. Minn Kota Riptide Terrova

Best Spot Lock Trolling Motor

Shaft Length

54 inches

Thrust Options

80 lbs

Voltage

24 volts

Max Amps

60 amps

Water Compatibility

Saltwater

Warranty

2-year warranty

One of the newer features of modern trolling motors is GPS capabilities. Along with electronic controls, the Minn Kota Riptide Terrova makes use of all of these features and a few more. The Riptide is one of the more expensive models on the market right now and the price is well worth it.

This 80 pound thrust motor has a 54-inch shaft capable of pulling a large boat or a pontoon of almost any weight. Not only that, but with touch-sensitive electronic controls, you can have it go wherever you need in a hurry.

The initial setup is a bit more complicated than a lot of standard trolling motors. You need to set up the GPS along with the compass to have everything work as expected. Once done, though, you can control your entire boat with a touch of a button.

What’s more, the anchor lock function makes this the best spot lock trolling motor on the market. When activated, your boat will stay in position, regardless of tides, currents, or wind. Find your perfect honey hole and sit over it without having to reposition constantly.

The Minn Kota trolling motor is ideal for saltwater fishing and can also be used in freshwater without any worries. And with a 2-year warranty, you can rest at ease knowing your investment is safe and secure.

Pros
  • GPS and compass ready
  • Includes Humminbird fish finder mount
  • Push button lift
Cons
  • More expensive than other options

7. Minn Kota Traxxis 45

Best Transom Mount Freshwater Trolling Motor

Shaft Length

36 inches

Thrust Options

45,55,70 Lbs.

Voltage

12 volts

Max Amps

50 amps

Water Compatibility

Freshwater

Warranty

2-years

Minn Kota makes the list again with the Traxxis 45. This is the best transom mount freshwater trolling motor you can find. With a 36-inch shaft, a transom mount is ideal for almost any watercraft.

If you have a larger or heavier boat, you can opt for a more powerful trolling motor. The Traxxis comes in 45, 55, or 70 thrust pound options, each with a maximum of 50 amp draw, which will rarely be seen. Most uses will fall between 30 and 35 amps, giving you more usage hours form a single battery.

However, the Traxxis does draw almost constantly, so you will need to keep an eye on your battery charge level. Deep cycle batteries should not ever be completely drained. However, with this model, you only need one. If you plan for a long day on the water, or a weekend, bringing a spare is a good idea.

While the motor is stainless and waterproof, it isn’t coated with anti-corrosion. Not suitable for saltwater use, you still need to clean and rinse with fresh water every time you pull it out of the lake.

Proper care will go a long way to ensuring the trolling motor lasts you for years to come. Maintenance is low as well. Besides the regular cleaning, you can expect a few hours per season for preventative care and standard maintenance, all of which is outlined in the owner’s manual.

Pros
  • High powered thrust options
  • Simple mounting
  • Controls are easy to use
Cons
  • Not suitable for saltwater

8. MotorGuide - GPS Attwood

Best GPS Trolling Motor

Shaft Length

48 inches

Thrust Options

55, 70 Lbs

Voltage

12 volts

Max Amps

52 amps

Water Compatibility

Freshwater

Warranty

2-years

If you rely on GPS for positioning and anchor points, then you want the best GPS trolling motor available. That title belongs to the MotorGuide Attwood. This GPS trolling motor is part of the MotorGuide Xi3 series of wireless motors.

The 12-volt battery discharges slower thanks to the Attwood digital power management, which will alert you when the deep cycle charge is too low. The real advantage here is the unique spin the MotorGuide model places on the GPS system.

Once calibrated, your boat can stay at its anchor point for hours on end with nothing more than your set point. The bow-mounted motor is perfect for your days on the lake, in ponds or along the shoreline of any freshwater body.

The 48-inch shaft means you won’t have to worry how light your boat gets; the prop will always be properly submerged. Full electric controls take control so you can focus on the water and your lines. Spend more time casting and catching and less time maneuvering or positioning.

With a full 2-year warranty and straightforward claims service, you will always know your trolling motor is ready and able whenever you are.

Pros
  • Great customer service
  • Better suited for deeper waters
  • Digital monitoring limits battery draw
Cons
  • Shafts may be too long for smaller boats

9. Seamax 55

Best Offshore Trolling Motor

Shaft Length

32 inches

Thrust Options

55 Lbs

Voltage

12 volts

Max Amps

52 amps

Water Compatibility

Freshwater or saltwater

Warranty

2-years

The Seamax 55 is the best offshore trolling motor. Whether you are beating the bushes or contouring the berms, this motor has you covered. The transom mount trolling motor is perfect for freshwater fishing, but also has a preinstalled anode for saltwater capabilities.

The ideal set up will have you mounting this motor on an aluminum boat or pontoon, though it is agile enough for a kayak or canoe. The 7 point adjustable mount also comes with an anti-theft quick release taper-lock. In or out of the water, a simple click of a switch, and you are ready to stow or go.

With 55 pounds of thrust, you can easily maneuver up to 2500 pounds of boat, passengers, and cargo. A lot of owners buy a second one for their barge to keep in the shallows while on the lake.

The 12-volt system and telescoping control handle keep you ergonomically in position for quick positioning and low battery drain. You can fish and use the trolling motor for several hours on a single battery charge, ideal for early morning fishing trips that turn into all-day affairs.

The 2-year warranty is honored and kept by the friendly customer service reps who do everything in their power to keep you satisfied and get you back out on the water.

Pros
  • Quick mounting
  • Anti-theft built-in
  • Rugged aluminum and steel construction
Cons
  • Not suitable for boats over 20 feet
  • Saltwater use needs extra maintenance

Where Can One Use Trolling Motors?

Trolling motors are found on almost every fishing craft in any water type. The most notable are kayaks, pontoons, and inflatables. However, fishing platforms, canoes, and other watercraft can make use of them, too.

Type

Kayak

Canoe

Inflatable

Boat

Fresh Water Motor

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Saltwater Motor

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Bow Mount

No

No

Yes

Yes

Transom Mount

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Engine Mount

No

No

If Applicable

Yes

Foot Control

No

No

Yes

Yes

Hand Control

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Electric Steer

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cable Steer

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes


Trolling Motor Components & Parts

The main issue with trolling motors is that they have a lot of parts. As with anything else electrical and motorized, the parts will break down, get damaged, or otherwise need replacing.

The top half of the trolling motor where your controls and connections are generally hold up pretty well throughout the years. The mounts and clamps may need adjustments or replacement over time, but that usually isn’t a concern.

The underwater parts, though, are a different story. The most commonly replaced component is the replaceable fin. This is the fin on the underside of the motor that helps turn the motor and steer the boat.

As you can imagine, it gets a lot of damage from rocks, river and lake beds, and other underwater or unseen obstacles. The same can be said for the propeller. The main propulsion system of the entire motor will need replacing on a more regular basis than most other parts.

Even the motor itself will burn out over time. You can replace the motor and propeller or have them serviced. The determining factor, of course, will be the cost of repair versus buying a new motor.

One thing to keep in mind is the battery that is being used. Primarily you will use 1, 2, or 3 deep cycle marine batteries to power your motor (depending on voltage requirements). Not only do these batteries need to be maintained and charged, but over time, they will need to be replaced as well.


Trolling Motor Sizing Guide

To get the optimal performance from your trolling motor, it needs to be the right size for your boat. The size here means both physically and power-wise.

Physical Measurements

The primary measurement you need is the length of the shaft. A few factors will determine this. First, if you are mounting on the bow or the transom. Bow shafts usually need to be at least 6-inches longer than transom mount shafts.

You also need to know the length from the end of the shaft to the center of the propeller. Minn Kota brands, for example, need 4 extra inches compared to a MotorGuide brand.

You also need to account for how deep or shallow the water you are fishing it will be. A general rule of thumb follows that for bow mount trolling motors, the shaft length should be 36-inches if the bow to the water line is 16 total inches or less. For every 6 inches extra to the water line, add 6 inches to the shaft length.

For the transom mounts, the same additional 6-inches is needed from the transom to waterline, but you start with a 30-inch shaft for up to 10-inches of space between transom and water, moving up in 6-inch increments from there.

Thrust Power Measurements

For the thrust power, you need to determine the weight of the boat, occupants, and gear. You also need to account for the voltage of the motor and the length of the boat.

The chart below will help you determine the minimum thrust power required. Remember, if you fish in areas with high winds or rough waters, you should always add a few more pounds of thrust.

Boat Weight (lbs)

Max Boat Length (ft)

Voltage

Minimum thrust (lbs)

Up to 1500

14

12

30

2000

18

12

45

2500

21

12

55

3000

23

24

70

4000

24

24

80

4500-5000

25

36

112


Mounting & Installation of Trolling Motor

The most popular mounting option is a bow mount. Since the bow is generally where you will be standing while fishing, it only makes sense to have your trolling motor controls nearby.

The transom and engine mounts are similar, of course, but have their differences. Your trolling motor will come with rigging and connection instructions, and many brands offer a DVD or online video to follow along with to make sure you do it right.

The basic steps of an install and set up include

  1. 1
    Decide which side of your boat you want to mount. Usually, it is opposite the side you fish from or like to view at.
  2. 2
    Find the mounting holes by removing the plate panels.
  3. 3
    Assemble the motor following specific brand instructions.
  4. 4
    Place the shaft near the center of the boat.
  5. 5
    Place the motor in the stow position and mark the mounting holes, so the motor doesn’t overhang the edge of the boat.
  6. 6
    Drill and screw the mounting holes to secure the bracket.
  7. 7
    Attach the mounting bolts to the underside of the boat.
  8. 8
    If you are using a fish finder, mount the transducer to the bottom of the motor, so it faces straight down.
  9. 9
    Connect your batteries and test your motor.

People Also Ask (FAQs)

Are trolling motors waterproof?

Trolling motors have a dust cap or a trolling motor plug that must be inserted or attached firmly. Once in place, the motors are rated IP67 waterproof.

What is the best thrust for a trolling motor?

The best thrust is going to be the thrust power capable of moving the size and weight of your boat and it’s contents, plus a few extra pounds for rough waters or high winds.

Is it possible to use a freshwater motor in saltwater?

It is possible; however, it isn't recommended. Saltwater has extra corrosion abilities over freshwater, and a freshwater trolling motor isn’t sealed or protected against these corrosives. If you have to use the motor in saltwater, it will need to be disassembled and cleaned thoroughly as soon as it is out of the water.

What type of battery do you need for your trolling motor?

Trolling motors require a deep cycle marine battery of 12 volts. Depending on the motor size, you may need two or even three batteries to get the proper voltage to the motor.

How fast can a boat go with a trolling motor?

The highest average speed of a trolling motor, regardless of size or thrust, is about 5 miles per hour. The lighter and smaller your boat, the closer to the full 5MPH you will achieve.

What are some steps for cleaning & maintaining these motors?

After every use you will need to inspect your motor for debris, damage and loose connections. Rinse the entire motor with fresh water, and for saltwater motors, make sure the anode is secure. Lubricate the composite shaft and disconnect your batteries. If you will be idle for a while, place the batteries on a slow charge.

What are some common issues when using trolling motors & how do I fix them?

One of the most common issues with trolling motors is that they won’t start. Because they are an electromagnetic motor, they require power. You should first check that the batteries are charged and connected properly. Electric motors also have switches, wiring, and fuses. Check the fuses and switches for broken or corroded parts and replace them if necessary. Then check the wiring to make sure it hasn’t come loose or become corroded.


Conclusion

Finding the right trolling motor isn’t as difficult as it may seem. As long as you know the average weight of the boat, its length, and how you want your motor to mount, you can get the perfect size and power in your new trolling motor.

If you are still having trouble deciding, I invite you to look at the top pick again. The Minn Kota Endura is a 12-volt transom mount motor that offers enough thrust power and size for most applications.

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