Best Spincast Reels: Reviewed, Rated & Compared

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If you are looking to get into fishing, have little to no experience selecting a reel, or want to have a few inexpensive, low-maintenance rods in the water at a time, a spincast reel might be for you. When it comes to catching fish, you need to be comfortable with your equipment and know that the reel you choose is going to be there to help you reel in your catch.

This article will look at the 8 best spincast reels available today and help you decide which model is right for you. We will cover the various factors you need to be on the lookout for as well as show you all the variations and when to select certain models over another. Read on to find your next spincast reel.

Preview

Model

Gear Ratio

Line Capacity

Check Price

Zebco 33KPL,10C,BX6 33 Platinum 5 Ball...

Zebco 33KPL

4.1:1

95/10 mono

Zebco Omega Pro Spincast Fishing Reel, 7...

Zebco Omega Pro

3.6:1

95/10 mono

KastKing Brutus Spincast Fishing...

KastKing Brutus

4.0:1

160/10 mono

Reels Spincast Pflueger PRES6SCX President...

Pflueger President

5.2:1

140/10 mono

Daiwa Goldcast Spincast Reel, GC100

Daiwa Goldcast Spincast

4.1:1

80/10 mono

Zebco ZB310BX3 Bullet Spincast Reel

Zebco ZB310BX3 Bullet

6.1:1

90/10 mono

Pflueger Trion Spincast Fishing Reel

Pflueger Trion

3.8:1

75/10 mono

Zebco 202 Spincast Reel, 10 lb

Zebco 202

2.8:1

110/10 mono


What Is a Spincast Reel and Why Use One?

A spincast reel is considered a beginner reel, or one designed for specific situations. The reel sits on top of the rod, instead of underneath it like a spinning reel. The line flows freely inside the cone-shaped cover from the weight of the line and lure.

When you are first introduced to fishing or have little experience, a spincast reel is ideal. This is true for children and inexperienced fishers, regardless of age. However, spincast reels also serve a unique role in the arsenal of the angler professional.

Spincast reels have a lighter line capacity, can't use as much weight on the line or in the lures, and this makes them ideal for open water fishing and for using a more natural cast. River fishing or in moving water, the splash down won’t startle fish as much, which makes a spincast reel perfect for landing multiple fish in a session.


Buying Guide: Choosing a Quality Spincast Reel

Whether you are buying your first fishing pole, or you are a seasoned pro looking to replace an older spincast reel, it is important to know how to identify a high-quality spincast reel. Below we offer you certain considerations to think about when deciding if a spincast is the right purchase for you.

Type of Fish & Environment

When first deciding which type of reel is the best for you, you should think about the type of fish you are after and where you will be fishing. Spincast reels are ideal for catching panfish in almost any water conditions. This will include your crappie and bluegills. If you are more of a stream or pier fisher, you can use a spincast for many trout species, as well as catfish and small bass.

Construction Quality/Corrosion Resistance

The ideal reel will have high-quality internal components and be built to last—everything from shielded ball bearings to a stainless thumb release. While many pieces are also made of plastic or resin to help keep the cost lower, sometimes a slight bump in price is worth it to get the better gears and winders found inside the reel.

Since the line you reel in will be wet, either with fresh or saltwater, it is essential to purchase a reel that is resistant to corrosion. While this may sound like something natural, there are a lot of cheap reels on the market that won't last a season because of corrosion.

Reel Features

Different reels will offer different features and options. While the majority of spincast reels will have a lot of similarities, it is the smaller things that can make or break your decision. The thumb button quality, for example, is one of the tell-tale signs of a high-quality reel.

Construction materials and assembly quality are also important. Cheaper reels will have lower quality cones, which can easily come off or unscrewed when casting. There are other factors as well, such as the gear ratio (we will cover this in detail later), ease of use, and line glide. Look for a reel that offers you as many features as you can comfortably afford. The more features, the better build the reel will have.

Drag & Brake System

Spincast reels generally have two brake systems in place. Using the front disc pad, an adjustment knob is turned to tighten or loosen this friction pad. The surface area of the front disc is small, and because of the heat, it won't be very accurate for very long with a fish on.

The rear drag is a two-way adjustable disc that is loosened or tightened by the angler as they are fighting the fish. This allows more precision control during the reeling, to help prevent line snaps or the fish pulling too much line.

Ball Bearings

Bearings allow the reel to spin freely, with as little friction as possible. Since friction creates heat and heat creates drag, the wrong bearings can cause line breakage on tougher fights or heavier fish. Open bearings are the fastest and create the least amount of friction. The ball bearings are exposed on top and bottom of the bearing casing. This allows them to roll freely, generating a minimal amount of friction.

Sealed or shielded bearings last longer but have either the top or bottom section shielded off. This creates a little more friction but prevents corrosion or contamination from water or debris. Double-shielded ball bearings have a cap on both ends, so the balls are completely enclosed. This is the slowest bearing, but also the most durable and long-lasting. Finding the right type of ball bearings for your fishing style is important.

Spool Size & Style

If you are buying a spincast reel, you will most likely purchase a skirted reel style. The internal style became outdated in the early 1980s and has quickly become more of a legend than a modern design. Skirted styles help prevent line tangling inside the reel and are easier to maintain, clean out, and wash off. They are more efficient, economical, and better for all anglers, especially beginners.

Line Capacity

Line capacity will vary depending on the type of line you use. Lines have different weights and thicknesses, and your reel will be rated for a certain length of a specific size. If you purchase a reel that can hold 120 yards of a 3-pound test line, it may hold less than 100 yards of a 4-pound line. Knowing the capacities will help you determine which type of line and how much you need to purchase and use.

Anti-Reverse Handles

You will also want to look for a model that has anti-reverse handles. This is a feature that engages the drag and prevents the reel from spinning backward. Of course, back-reeling instead of using the drag is a common tactic used by some anglers. If this is you (or you want to try it), make sure that you purchase a reel that allows you to turn the anti-reverse feature on and off.

Price & Warranty

Obviously, the price is going to matter somewhat. Spincast reels are among the least expensive of all reel styles. However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t models out there that cost more than you may expect.

Your reel should be affordable according to your budget, but it should also come with a decent warranty. Most reels will offer a 1-year limited warranty. Finding a more extended warranty is a great sign and should be considered heavily for this factor alone.


8 Best Spincast Reels Reviewed

Below we offer the 8 best spincast fishing reels, reviewed, compared, and outlined based on their features and usefulness. Each model below will have pros and cons, as all reels do. You only need to read through the list and find the best model that meets your needs and desires.

1. Zebco 33KPL

Best Spincast Reel (Top Pick!)

Reel Size/Weight

8.5 x 5.7 x 9 Inches/9.7oz

Gear Ratio

4.1:1

Line Capacity

95/10 mono

Ball Bearings

5 bearings

Key Feature

All-Metal Body

Warranty

1-year warranty

Zebo is a name that is instantly recognized by most anglers that have been fishing for more than a week. It is no wonder that the Zebco 33KPL is the best spincast reel and our top pick. An advanced version of the highly popular Zebco 33, the KPL features an all-metal body, using platinum to avoid corrosion and look great sitting on your rod.

Is Zebco a good reel, though? In all truthfulness, Zebco makes fine reels, and the 33KPL is no exception. The durability, low-maintenance, and ease of use only cement the 33-series as one of the best in the market.

One thing a lot of anglers find with the 33KPL, though, is that the thumb button, or trigger, can get stuck. This isn't an uncommon issue with spincast reels and is as simple as twisting the drag adjustment dial. You can fix the drag here as well. The micro-adjustment feature allows you to fine-tune your drag to suit the fish or conditions to suit your needs.

Can you add a braided line to the Zebco 33KPL? Yes, you can, though you will need to go with a larger, thicker line. You can get about 90 feet of a 30# braid wrapped on the spool. Many anglers find that the Draco 30# braided line works well with this reel.

Pros
  • All-metal body fights corrosion
  • 5 stainless bearings for easy retrieval
  • Can be used by left or right handed anglers.
Cons
  • Thumb button can stick

2. Zebco Omega Pro

Best Rated Spincast Reel

Reel Size/Weight

8.5 x 9 x 5.5 inches/1.3 pounds

Gear Ratio

3.6:1

Line Capacity

95/10 mono

Ball Bearings

7 bearings

Key Feature

Quick-change spool

Warranty

1-year warranty

As you can imagine, with the line up offered and the high quality of the designs, Zebco will have a few entrants on this best-of list. The best rated spincast reel is the Zebco Omega Pro. This sleek designed reel offers you an all-aluminum casing and brass gears designed to withstand most water conditions and won’t corrode easily.

However, for the saltwater fishermen out there, the brass gears will need a bit of extra maintenance when you are cleaning and lubing. Otherwise, regular care and handling is all that is needed. One of the most impressive features is the ability to carry different lines, weights, or diameters on the two quick-change spools.

If you want to change out in the middle of your fishing trip, it takes only a couple of minutes to add the new spool, feed the eyelets and tie new lures. You can go from crappie fishing to bass or catfish without having to change rods or reels.

This durable reel also features 7 bearings to increase the casting speed and distance and improve retrieval with a fish on. Everything functions smooth and true; whether you are right or left hand reeling, the easily adaptable Zebco Omega Pro is a go-to reel for many pros and beginners alike.

Pros
  • Comes with 2 quick-change spools
  • Low maintenance required
  • Smooth casting and reeling
Cons
  • Brass gears aren’t the best for saltwater
  • Difficult to keep spooled line taught when changing spools.

3. KastKing Brutus

Best Budget Spincast Reel

Reel Size/Weight

7.5 x 8 x 7.2 Inches/9.8oz.

Gear Ratio

4.0:1

Line Capacity

160/10 mono

Ball Bearings

5 bearings

Key Feature

Aluminum honeycomb casing

Warranty

1-year warranty

The KastKing Brutus reel has two things worth noting. First, this reel has one of the easiest, furthest casting abilities around. Most anglers (even beginners) can cast further using this reel than they can with a baitcast reel.

Second, this is the best budget spincast reel on the market. For the price, you would expect a sub-par, “beginners only” type of construction and material. However, what you get is a high-quality, durable, and reliable reel that outperforms others at twice the price.

Of course, there are downsides, too. The most prominent disadvantage is that the Brutus reel uses a steel rotor. While the line catches are stainless, the rotor is not. This means that if it isn’t cared for after every use, corrosion can set in. This makes the maintenance of the reel a little higher than most others, which can be a breaking point for some anglers.

The other negative comes in the thumb-dial drag feature. In theory, the dial allows you to adjust the drag at any time, with up to 11 pounds. However, with the dual-pickup and lack of line slack at all times, the thumb-dial can be challenging to turn when the reel is being used.

The trade-off is a reel that casts further than almost any other, a low price point and virtually no backlash, even after 500 casts. If you want to save money and stay in the high-quality reels, look at the KastKing Brutus. It doesn’t disappoint.

Pros
  • Aluminum cone and graphite casing lowers weight.
  • Virtually no backlash
  • Far casting with minimal effort
Cons
  • Thumb-dial drag can be difficult to move
  • Steel rotor can corrode if not cared for.

4. Pflueger President

Best Spincast Crappie Reel

Reel Size/Weight

5.6 x 6.7 x 8.2 inches/10.2oz

Gear Ratio

5.2:1

Line Capacity

140/10 mono

Ball Bearings

5 bearings

Key Feature

All aluminum casing and core

Warranty

Not specified

If you want a smooth casting, easy reeling crappie catching monster, the Pflueger President series is for you. There are four sizes to choose from between 2000 and 4000. Each size will add bearings and increase the capacity of the reel for your line. However, when hunting crappie, any of the four sizes will work.

The stand out features here include a durable, rugged, and high-quality build. The all-aluminum casing and core create a lightweight reel that seems to cast over a mile. It doesn't, but you won't believe how far your lure goes when slinging this reel around.

The President series isn’t going to turn heads or even be that noticeable when sitting on your rod, but the fish won't notice either. Pulling crappie out of the water is nearly effortless, and you can catch, unhook and recast in no time.

The Pflueger President reel also uses Teflon washers for friction plates, keeping the weight down while being fully adjustable on the go. The drag is applied directly to the line, so you have little to do but yank and reel. The crappie at your favorite fishing hole won't know what hit them.

Pros
  • Won’t corrode, even in saltwater use.
  • 4 sizes to choose from.
  • Ideal for lightweight lures used for crappie fishing
Cons
  • Doesn’t use braided line well, even with backing.

5. Daiwa Goldcast Spincast

Best Spincast Reel Under $50

Reel Size/Weight

5 x 4 x 3 inches/9.9oz.

Gear Ratio

4.1:1

Line Capacity

80/10 mono

Ball Bearings

1 bearing

Key Feature

Small footprint size

Warranty

1-year warranty

You want the best, and you want it cheap. We get it. In that case, the Diawa Goldcast reel is the ideal match. This small reel will fit virtually any rod and is perfect for smaller hands, including female anglers and children.

Don’t let the small stature fool you. Casting this reel is a dream come true; the lure and line fly straight, and even wind won't cause backlash during heavy use. However, because of the smaller size, there won't be as much room for your line. The Goldcast works best with 80 yards of 10# test monofilament line, but thicker or heavier lines can be used, just at a lower length.

For the most part, the drop in line distance won’t matter a whole lot, but when you couple that with the lighter lines breaking easier, you may find that you are re-spooling your line more often than with other, larger reels.

With a single bearing, there isn’t much room for difficulty. While it may seem that the single bearing design makes things difficult to cast or reel, the opposite is true. The Daiwa Goldcast is smooth as silk and won’t give you any problems casting, reeling, or maintaining.

Pros
  • Small size is ideal for smaller hands
  • Won’t have backlash as often as some models.
  • Eye-catching gold cone
Cons
  • Internal drag can become out of alignment easily.
  • Not ideal for larger fish or heavy lures.

6. Zebco ZB310BX3 Bullet

Best Spincast Reel For Bass Fishing

Reel Size/Weight

7.5 x 6 x 3.8 inches/1.19lbs.

Gear Ratio

6.1:1

Line Capacity

90/10 mono

Ball Bearings

9 bearings

Key Feature

Zero-friction dual bearing pick up

Warranty

1-year warranty

Zebco makes a return to our list with the best spincast reel for bass fishing. The Zebco Bullet (ZB310BX3) is easily the single best spincast model for catching bass in lakes, rivers, and ponds. The Bullet, like the Omega, comes with a second spool, using the Zebco quick-change feature.

So you can swap lines, types, or weights without having to re-spool in the middle of your trip. One thing to note is that the Bullet model doesn’t fare well with braided line. While some do have success with it, the braided line has a lot of backlash and gets tangled on the pickups more than usual.

For the monofilament line, though, the Bullet is as fast as the name implies. Each crank of the retrieve will bring in 29 inches of line! At an incredible 6.1:1 medium gear ratio, the 29” retrieve is astonishing. The whole time, your line stays taught and isn’t as susceptible to breakage.

The 9-bearing system uses a dual-bearing technology on the pickup, making the entire system smooth and comfortable with virtually no friction at all. The 9th bearing is in the clutch and helps to prevent the trigger from snagging, meaning you get beautiful casts and speedy reels every time.

Pros
  • Extremely fast 29” return per rotation
  • Smooth operation with 9 bearings
  • Left or right handed retrieve.
Cons
  • Can get caught up on the pick up when casting.
  • Not ideal in high winds

7. Pflueger Trion

Best Underspin Spincast Reel

Reel Size/Weight

5.2 x 4.9 x 6 inches/10.6oz.

Gear Ratio

3.8:1

Line Capacity

75/10 mono

Ball Bearings

2 bearings

Key Feature

Aluminum casing and cone

Warranty

Not Specified

If you like the spinning reel style that sits below your rod, instead of on top of it, the Pflueger Trion is the best underspin spincast reel for you. This spincast reel has a large, easily pulled trigger for easy casting.

Reeling this reel in is also almost effortless. The rotor rotates with the line, making it a suitable underspin reel while still maintaining the ease of use that a spincast model offers you. The cone helps prevent backlash while the two-bearing system keeps things moving smoothly.

The gear ratio is low, so you can maintain control the entire time. It also has a perfectly positioned anti-reverse switch, which allows you to engage or disengage as needed. The drag isn't as easily accessible, and it is better to set the drag before casting. This will help you when reeling the fish in without worrying about losing too much line.

One thing to note is that the bearings can get a little noisy. While other reels will develop problems that cause noisy bearings, the Trion model is just noisy. It doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with the reel. However, if you notice the bearings are starting to grind, then you may need to disassemble the reel to investigate.

Pros
  • Simple trigger system
  • Combines spinning and spincast reel benefits.
  • Smooth cast and reeling
Cons
  • Bearings can be noisy

8. Zebco 202

Best Spincast Reel For Kids

Reel Size/Weight

0.4 x 0.4 x 0.4 inches/8.8 ounces

Gear Ratio

2.8:1

Line Capacity

110/10 mono

Ball Bearings

0 bearings

Key Feature

All-gear spincast mechanism

Warranty

1-year warranty

If you are looking to get the next generation of anglers hooked (pun intended), the Zebco 202 is the ideal match for all beginners and children alike. The no-bearing system is easy to use and doesn’t offer a lot of features usually found on reels.

The lack of features is done on purpose and isn't' a detraction from the value. Not only is the reel affordable, but it is also ideal for someone who doesn't fish often or has never fished before. The introduction to a rod and reel is made simple with the design and easy system of the 202.

Without bearings, you don't have to worry about drag and adjustments. While any pro angler will need these features, a child casting for the first time will need to learn the basics first. The Zebco 202 is the perfect match for learning fishers and hands that aren't used to the mechanics of casting and reeling yet.

The one downside here is that the 202 is a right-hand only model. So, if your child is left handed, the 202 isn’t going to be a good match. This doesn’t mean that the child can’t use it, but the mechanics may be more awkward doing so.

Pros
  • Ideal for beginners of all ages
  • Simple use casting
  • Low ratio for easier control
Cons
  • No on the fly adjustments
  • Right-handed only

Comparing Baitcast Vs. Spinning Vs. Spincast Reels

Spincast reels have their advantages, especially for beginners. However, there are two other types of reels that anglers love, the spinning reel and the baitcast reel. How do they compare to the spincast style? Let’s take a look.

  • Spincast Reel Vs. Spinning Reel
    For the most part, spinning reels are similar to spincast reels. The most notable difference is the lack of a cone cover on a spinning reel. Also called an open spinner, the spinning reel also doesn’t have a casting thumb button. Instead of the button, anglers hold the line with their finger while casting. The spinner reels allow you to use heavier lines and catch more massive fish as a result. They are still quite simple to operate once you understand the mechanics behind a cast. The drag and brake system will vary slightly from a spincast reel, but otherwise, the two act the same.
  • Spincast Reel Vs. Baitcast Reel
    Baitcast reels are a different animal compared to spincast. The style of fishing is much different, as well. Baitcast reels are generally larger and sit parallel to the rod instead of under it (like a spinning reel) or over it(like a spincast). The baitcasting models offer a lot more torque and, as a result, handle more line, heavy lures and can navigate waters otherwise inaccessible. If you like fishing near underwater foliage where lures and lines often get caught up, you need the strength, power and torque of a baitcast reel.

Understanding Gear Ratio for Spincasting

Gear ratio is the number of times the line will wrap around the spool for every turn of the handle. Different gear ratios will allow you to better use different baits or lures. It is also beneficial to know your gear ratio for the type of fish you are trying to catch.

  • Low Gear Ratio/Slow (5.1:1 thru 5.4:1)
    Low gear is ideal for using bait instead of lures when you want the fish to come to the hook on their own. This lower gear allows you to put less strain on the line when reeling and keeps the fish tight on the hook.
  • Medium Gear Ratio/Medium (6.1:1 thru 6.4:1)
    According to Bass Pro Shops, the most common reel ratio is 6.4:1. This means that for every full turn of your reel handle, the line is wrapped 6.4 times around the spool. It is the most common because it is fast enough to use jiggs and spinners in calmer waters and still allows you to use fresh bait on lines that are dropped and set.
  • High Gear Ratio/Fast (7.1:1 thru 8.1:1)
    High gear ratios are anything over 7.1:1. These are the gears ideal for using buzzbait or spinnerbaits to mimic live animals on the water surface or just below. It also gives you more accuracy and control over the drag and break. However, thinner or lightweight lines may break under the higher pressure.

Spincast Reel Sizing Guide

Every reel will come with a number (or a few numbers) stamped on them. These 4-digit numbers refer to the amount of line that size reel will hold. The smaller the number is the lighter weight line that the reel will support.

When choosing your reel size, you need to think about the type and weight of the line and bait or lures you plan to use. It also helps to know where you will fish the most with that reel. The water type and conditions will also play a factor in the needed line weight.


How to Set Up & Use a Spincast Reel

Setting up, adding fishing line, and using a spincast reel is a straightforward and generally simple process. Let’s outline each section of the procedure below.

  • How To Spool A Spincast Reel
    When you first purchase a spincast reel, there won’t be any line on it (unless you purchase a rod and reel kit, which may already be strung). You will need to remove the cone cover and run the new line through the hole in the cone and into the reel spool. If your reel is attached to a rod already, you may want to run the line through the rod eyelet guides (from tip to handle) first. Once the line is at the reel, you will need to slide it through the spool guide and tie the line using an arbor knot.
  • How To Put New Line On A Spincast Reel
    Once the line is tied, you will need to spool the new line onto the spincast reel. Laying the reel on the ground or flat, steady surface, you will need both hands working together.With one hand you need to hold the line and keep it taught. With your other hand, begin reeling the line in. It is important that you keep tension on the line with your holding hand to prevent the line from becoming loose inside the spool. Loose line will catch on itself and tangle inside the cone and will cause casting issues in the future. Reel the line until the spool is full and tie it off to the end of your rod or attach a weight to keep the line tight until use.
  • How To Set Up A Spincast Reel
    Setting up your spincast reel will depend greatly on how you plan to use it. Most anglers will use a weight, bobber, and hook for the bait. After the line is fed through the rod eyelets, you will want to attach a hook to the end of the line. Pull out your sinker weights and add them a few inches from the hook.You want enough weight to drop your bait, but not so much it weighs down the line. Finally, you can add a bobber to the line. The bobber should be between 1 and 2 feet from the hook to allow your line to sink without dragging the bottom of where you are fishing.
  • How To Cast A Spincast Reel
    Casting a spincast reel is one of the easiest casts in fishing. You will want to use an overhead swinging motion, like throwing a baseball. When you are ready to cast, press and hold the thumb button and bring the rod overhead. As you swing your arm and the rod forward, release the thumb button to let loose the line. With a few practice casts, you will have your line in the middle of the lake in no time.

People Also Ask (FAQs)

What is the best fishing line for spincast reel?

Arguably the best type of line is monofilament. This line is stretchy, soft and sits in the spool really well. It is also easier to maintain and won’t bunch or weave like braided lines can. The stretch and give of monofilament line allows you to reel smoother and not have to worry about the line tangling inside the spincast reel cone.

How does a spincast drag systems work?

Drag in a spincast reel is nothing more than friction plates that adjust the resistance on the line. When you have a fish on and it pulls, the friction plates slow or stop the line from being pulled out. You can adjust the resistance by rotating the drag dial on the spool, which should be done before casting for the first time of the day. The more resistance, the less line will be released when fighting your fish, but the greater the chance that the line could snap.

Can I use braided line on a spincast reel?

While it isn't generally done, you can use a braided line on a spincast reel. The thinner diameter makes for a more difficult spooling and use. When using braided line, you will need a backer to help prevent the line from slipping.

It is also recommended that your spool have a metal pick up to help casting and reeling. However, be warned that when using braided line, wind can cause a lot of problems and serious knots you will have to deal with.

How do you maintain a spincast reel?

Cleaning and maintaining your reels is a crucial part of the fishing hobby. Spincast reels are generally easy to maintain. You will need to remove them from the rod, disassemble the housing and cone and remove any old line (unless you are keeping it).

Using a soft toothbrush and light soap and water, scrub all the parts of the spool, housing and gears. Rinse under running water and let dry. Use lubricant designed for fishing equipment when you reassemble the reel. For storage, keep the reel in a cool, dry place away from direct sun, heat sources, or moisture.

Who makes the best spincast reels?

The title of best is always going to be subjective. However, when it comes to spincast reels, there are a few names that withstand the test of time, tradition, and consumer reviews. Zebco and Pflueger are among the most purchased and reviewed reels available.

If you are looking to get good quality while saving some money, Shakespeare and Daiwa are among the budget-friendly leaders. Finally, Abu Garcia has a long-standing tradition of high quality spincast reels that many find to be the best of the bunch.

What should I do to prevent backlash when throwing a spincast reel?

Having high-quality reels and the proper line are the first line of defense. You should also try to avoid casting at record distances. If backlash (when the spool keeps spinning after a cast resulting in line tangling) is a problem, you need to check the tension and resistance on your line and ensure that the tie offs aren’t slipping around the spool.

Where can I buy these spincast reels and other reel parts?

The best place to purchase a spincast reel is through Amazon. While you can find many models at brick and mortar stores, in sporting goods departments and various bait and tackle shops, Amazon will have the biggest selection. When shopping through Amazon, you are also getting tracked delivery, late model discounts and special pricing options that may not be found anywhere else.


Conclusion

Choosing the right spincast reel for your specific needs can be daunting. While most anglers prefer to use a baitcast or spinning reel, there is a special place in all tackle for a spincast reel. As long as you get a high-quality reel with great construction and durable parts, the reel can last you for several years.

If you have trouble deciding which model to purchase, I steer you towards the top pick, Zebco’s 33KPL. The reel is durable, rugged and easy to maintain. It is ideal for beginners and professionals alike. You won’t be disappointed.