8 Best Fly Tying Kits: Reviewed, Rated & Compared

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Fly fishing is one of the most popular sports in the US, and the momentum shows no sign of slowing. For some anglers, it's a way to connect with the beautiful outdoors. Others love it for the experience of catching that monster fish to feed their friends and families. And others love it for their ability to get creative when they’re tying their own flies.

You may get that perfect catch with good ole fashion flies bought from a fly store, but nothing gives an angler a new level of appreciation than to get that perfect catch than with their very own flies. The path to tying amazing flies may not come easily or naturally to some anglers, but with time and practice comes durable flies that have exceptional longevity. And the reward is 10-fold compared to that of store-bought flies.

Preview

Product

Weight

Case

Check Price

Dr Slick Fly Tying Tools Gift Set with Fly...

Dr. Slick

0.65 pounds

Yes

Scientific Anglers Deluxe Fly Tying Kit

Scientific Anglers Deluxe

1.39 pounds

Yes, Heavy Duty with clasps

WETFLY Deluxe Fly Tying Kit with Book and...

WETFLY Deluxe

1.65 pounds

Yes

Orvis Fly-tying Kit

Orvis Premium

3.8 pounds

Yes

Colorado Anglers Z797 Wooden Fly Tying...

Colorado Anglers Z797

1.6 pounds

Yes, composed of wood

DDF Beginner Fly Tying Kits for Trout,...

DDF Beginner

0.47 pounds

No

Muskoka Lifestyle Products Fly Tying Material...

Muskoka

Lifestyle

0.35 pounds

No

Zephr Travel Fly Tying Kit w/Travel Bag for...

Zephyr Travel

4.5 pounds

Yes


Why Tie Your Own Flies?

Tying your own flies will empower you and anglers alike to catch more fish with creativity. It allows an angler to not only replicate their favorite insect at the fly shop but also gives you the freedom to make custom patterns no one else has.

By allowing yourself to get creative, you can also focus on the size and strength of the fly you’re tying. So, for example, you’re fishing for striped sea bass in your area. You may need a 10-inch alewife to seek its attention. These flies aren't found too regularly in some fish shops, so creating your own may be your best or last option. 


How to Choose a Quality Fly Tying Kit

Quality

The quality of a tied fly is based on the type of materials that were used in the construction process. The higher-priced kits generally have higher quality materials, so look out for what the materials are constructed of when you're choosing your perfect kit.  Four materials are typically used when constructing your fly:

  1. 1
    Metal: This includes hooks and leads wires to add weight
  2. 2
    Synthetic Materials: This includes plastics, poly-yarn or foam as a base
  3. 3
    Fabrics and Threads: You’ll find the fabrics and threads on the outer layer, and they're used to keep the fly structure intact
  4. 4
    Natural Materials: This includes many types of fur (rabbit, fox, seal, and mink), hair (elk, caribou, and deer)

If you use high-quality materials, then you could see your fly in your kit for a very long time.

Packaging/Organizer Case

You'll need to make sure that your materials aren't just bought in good quality, but they stay in good condition, too. Having an organizer for your materials and finished products will allow you to keep your bait in order and organized well.

There are many organizers and cases in all different shapes and sizes. Some kits will come with a case as well. But be mindful and make sure your case fits your needs, whether it's with the size, durability, or if it's equipped with a specific lining (like soft foam) for extra protection. Organizers can also come in a high-intensity case. These are resistant to pressure and are highly effective when protecting your tackle on excursions.

Must-Have Tools

Every kit comes with some must-haves that are essential when making flies but also when it comes to any repairs on an existing fly. These must-haves are:

  1. 1
    Tying Vise: A fly tying vise is an essential component to your fly tying kit, especially to those new to the art of fly making. It can come on a pedestal base or a C-clamp. C-clamps are better and more studier if you're working from a specific station. Whereas Pedestal bases are great if you're using it while traveling.
  2. 2
    Whip finish tool: A whip finish tool is used for finishing heads on any size fly. The head of the tool has a curved wire portion that rotates easily, so anglers can tie off the thread. This is a lot easier than trying to do it by hand.
  3. 3
    Scissors: When it comes to fly making, it’s almost impossible to do it without good scissors. Scissors in fly tying kits are made to last and are the perfect size for a range of fly sizes.
  4. 4
    Bobbin holder/ Bobbin wire loops: Fly tying bobbin holders are used for distributing the load and freeing your hands. They have brass, plastic, or ceramic tubes (depending on the price). To maintain tension, the holder needs to be reasonably heavy.
  5. 5
    Hacker Pliers: These are excellent for wrapping hackles, lures, or hooks. They are also great for drying your flies. When you're using hacker pliers, push the base inwards towards the spring-loaded wire loop, and then release the bottom for a firm hold.
  6. 6
    Bodkin Needle: Bodkins are used for threading cords, elastics, or tapes through pre-made holes and tubes. It looks like a simple needle, but it's beneficial for the finished flies.

Instruction Manual

All kits may have the must-haves, but it’s essential to look at the instruction manuals that assist each kit. You may have had tool kits before, but with new technology arising, you may not get all of the benefits unless you read that manual. This is particularly important for beginners. In your tool kit, you will have a manual explaining the use of each instrument. Studying this could have you making quality flies faster and with more ease.

Extra Accessories

With so many tool kits available, companies are beginning to add extra accessories to stand out from their competition. Usually, these added bonuses are in kits at higher price points. These accessories can be heavier threads, adhesive glues, and materials like feathers. Feathers are a great accessory as they help a fly to float on the water.

Price

Whether you’re new to tying fish, or you’re hoping to get a new kit to improve your skills. The price that you'll pay differs from brand to size. It's important to focus on what you'll require your kit for, too. If you're buying a kit to improve your skills at home, then a bigger, bulkier kit will be easier to find at a lower price point. Or you may need to spend more on a kit that's lightweight to travel with. Either way, our list will help you find a fly tying kit that's good for your needs, and that's within your budget.


8 Best Fly Tying Kits Reviewed

1. Dr. Slick

Our Top Pick

Weight

0.65 pounds

Instruction Manual

No

Case

Yes

Hook

No, must be Purchased separately

Thread

No, must be purchased separately

What’s Included in the Kit?

  • bobbin
  • four-inch scissors 
  • whip finisher
  • bobbin threader 
  • hair stacker 
  • hackle pliers

We start our list with our top pick, The Dr. Slick Fly Tying tool kit. Dr. Slick Company was founded in 1989 by a surgeon with a passion for fly tying. So, there’s tremendous attention to detail on their precise and perfect tools. Just like surgical tools, these pieces were designed to be high quality and specialized. You can see all of the attention to detail once you open the reusable fly box.

Dr. Slick fly tying tools are easy to use, durable and esthetically pleasing. It’s kitted out with a pair of scissors, bobbin, bobbin threader, half hitch tool(also known as a bodkin), a pair of hackle pliers, a whip finisher and a hair stacker. Add a vise to this, and you have a great quality setup at a great price, too. They're all conveniently packaged in a foam lining to keep them in place and safe, even on the road.

There is also a 6-step inspection process on each instrument to ensure the highest quality possible. And if you’re still not sold, Dr. Slick offers a lifetime guarantee against workmanship and defects to really put your mind at ease. So, whether you're new to fly tying or you’re looking to upgrade your kit, this will give you the confidence to begin or continue your craft.

Pros
  • Compact, filled with essentials
  • Reasonably priced
  • A smart gift for anglers
  • Tools are durable and high-quality
Cons
  • No vise is included which can be essential for beginners
  • Fly tying materials are not included. They have to be bought separately

2. Scientific Anglers Deluxe

Best Fly Tying Tool Kit (Runner Up)

Weight

1.39 pounds

Instruction Manual

Yes, a DVD

Case

Yes, Heavy Duty with clasps

Hook

Yes

Thread

Yes

What’s Included in the Kit?

  • Scissors
  • Hair Stacker
  • Dry Fly
  • Dubbing
  • Thread
  • Copper Wire
    • Heavy-duty vise
    • Thread 
    • Bobbin threader
    • Hackle Pliers
    • Pheasant Tail
    • Poly Yarn
    • Chenille 
    • Marabou
    • Hackle
    • Elk Hair
    • Peacock Herl

    The Scientific Anglers Deluxe kit could have you hooked to fly tying as it comes in a close second. This kit comes with everything to begin fly tying and includes some quality tools, hooks, and materials all packaged in a deluxe travel case.  You’ll be able to create effective dry flies, wet flies, nymphs, streamers, and even more.

    Once you open the case, you’ll be amazed at all that Scientific Anglers deluxe thought of when creating this kit. There are over 20 fly tying items inside, from extra accessories like feathers and herl to the solid starter vise with a fixed angle head and versatile c-clamp base.

    The vise, too, is strong enough to hold hooks easily. Some other essential items to note are the threader, bodkin, hackle pliers, and scissors. If all of these aren’t enough, you’ll also find a special instruction DVD featuring Greg Vinci giving novice and expert anglers tips and tricks, too.

    It's bigger and heavier than our top pick and may not be as well suited for those hoping to travel long distances, but overall, it’s a great pick that’s priced well so you won’t be disappointed in your purchase.

    Pros
    • Great kit, especially for novice tiers
    • Comes with tools, and fly tying materials
    • A c-clamp vise is included
    • The case is high quality with good clasps
    Cons
    • Not ideal for wooly buggers
    • DVD features items that aren’t in the kit

    3. WETFLY Deluxe

    Best Beginner Fly Tying Kit

    Weight

    1.65 pounds

    Instruction Manual

    Yes, DVD and Book instructions

    Case

    Yes

    Hook

    Yes, in three different sizes

    Thread

    Yes, in two colors

    What’s Included in the Kit?

  • Black Thread
  • Fine Copper Wire
  • Peacock Herl
  • Pheasant Tail
  • Instructional Book
  • Instructional DVD
  • Elk Hair
  • Hair Stacker
    • Hook sizes
    • Grey Dubbing
    • Olive Dubbing
    • Medium Chenille
    • Marabou
    • Grizzly Hackle
    • Brown Hackle
    • White Poly
    • Yarn
    • Vise
    • Scissors
    • Hackle Pliers
    • Bobbin
    • Bobbin Threader

    If you’re looking for a versatile kit in the mid-priced range, then the WETFLY Deluxe tool kit could be for you. It comes with the high-quality tools that anglers in the beginner and intermediate levels will require to tie flies.

    Many anglers begin tying flies to save money, and this kit will accommodate this. It has 48 hooks in three different sizes (small, medium, and large). If you're focusing on smaller flies, then you’ll need to use its Super AA Vise with a C-clamp as the small hooks are a little hard to use, especially as a beginner.

    Copper and black threads are also included, as well as chenille and yarn. These materials are great for making the body of popular fly patterns like the woolly bugger and other insects. Some of the natural materials you’ll find in this kit are Rabbit Dubbing in Olive and Gray, Medium Chenille, Marabou in Olive, Hackle in Grizzly and Brown, Elk’s hair. So there’s plenty of options to make a whole range of flies suitable for many habitats.

    Also, the tools are contained in a nice case, filled with high-density foam, so it keeps everything in one place and neatly organized. The clasps have shown to be a little flimsy for some anglers, but overall, the instruments and materials inside give you plenty of options to make nymphs and wet flies. The starter kit also includes an instructional book and DVD that has proven to be helpful for beginners.

    Pros
    • Plenty of materials to make a various range of flies
    • Comes with a DVD and an instruction book
    • Carry case included
    • Reasonably priced
    Cons
    • The vise has proven to be a little unsteady for professional anglers

    4. Orvis Premium

    Top of the Range

    Weight

    3.8 pounds

    Instruction Manual

    Yes, Instructional DVD

    Case

    Yes

    Hook

    Yes, two sizes included

    Thread

    Yes, 8 thread colors

    What’s Included in the Kit?

    • BH Sili-Prince
    • Rusty Parachute
    • Elk Hair
    • Caddis
    • San Juan Worm
    • BH Lightning Bug
    • Zebra Midge
    • Hollow Egg
    • Includes 8 basic and 8 guide patterns
    • Woolly Bugger
    • Klinkhammer
    • SOS Nymph
    • BH Caddis
    • Larva
    • Chernobyl Ant
    • Parachute
    • Emerger
    • Pearl Flash Zonker
    • Fur Ant
    • Black Rubber Leg Stone

    Our top of the range pick has to be the Orvis premium fly tying kit. Once you purchase this kit, you’ll receive information for 8 basic patterns and 8 guide-proven premium patterns. You will also have enough tools and materials to practice all 16 designs with 10 flies each so you can make around 160 flies without topping up your kit of materials.

    This kit comes with a high-quality vise and toolset. These tools include ceramic lined bobbin, scissors, bodkin, half-hitch tool, hackle plier, hair stacker, and whip finish tool. Each tool is made from stainless steel, allowing them to be extremely durable. The convenient carrying case is an added plus, too. It's a good size for all that's in it.

    This kit is not just loaded with materials and top quality tools. It also comes with an instructional DVD. It's packed with tutorials for every pattern made expressly for the kit, and it also goes over basic tool instructions.

    Some anglers complain that DVD’s accompanying kits can be a little generic, but not this one! Anglers who have bought this kit particularly like the instruction DVD. The creator of this kit, Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions, is considered by most anglers as the best fly-tying videographer around. So it’s made by a fisherman for the fishermen.

    Pros
    • Has all the necessary tools for tying flies
    • Great for anglers of all levels
    • Quality information for 8 basic patterns and 8 guide-proven premium patterns
    • Learn from Tim Flagler in a well developed instructional DVD
    Cons
    • Heavy, not great for traveling long distances

    5. Colorado Anglers Z797

    Best Cheap Fly Making Starter Kit

    Weight

    1.6 pounds

    Instruction Manual

    No

    Case

    Yes, composed of wood

    Hook

    No

    Thread

    No

    What’s Included in the Kit?

    • Built-in vise
    • bobbin
    • threader
    • bodkin
    • dubbing twister
    • hackle pliers
    • scissors
    • whip finisher

    If you’re looking for a fly tying kit on a budget, this kit has every essential tool to set you off. The setup is very compact and easily fits into any backpack, with its dimensions being 9.5 x 6 x 2 inches. A thick sized novel may take up more space in your backpack, so traveling with this kit won't be a problem.

    Even though the Colorado Anglers Z797  of tools may not be the most aesthetically pleasing, they can make beautiful flies like any of its competitors. Inside the wooden carrying case, you'll find vise with a base, and 8 tools made of high-grade thick steel. These are a bobbin, threader, bodkin, dubbing twister, hackle pliers, scissors, and a whip finishing tool.

    One thing that makes this stand out from the rest is it is a built-in base vise. This vise is exceptionally durable for the price. It's sturdy, so this portable set can be used anywhere without having to worry about a surface for the clamp. While there are no materials or furs or threads included, you will find that the tools are conveniently sized, so you will find it very easy to work with.

    Pros
    • Great product at a low price
    • Convenient to store and to travel with
    • Suitable for all levels
    • Built-in base so it can be used anywhere
    • Instruments are made of thick steel
    Cons
    • No instruction manual included
    • Materials and threads need to be purchased separately

    6. DDF Beginner

    Best Saltwater Fly Tying Kit

    Weight

    0.47 pounds

    Instruction Manual

    Yes, Instructions For multiple patterns are included

    Case

    No

    Hook

    Yes, an assortment of hooks included

    Thread

    Yes, 3 spools included

    What’s Included in the Kit?

    • AA vise
    • Assorted hooks
    • Thread
    • Scissors
    • Floss
    • Bobbin
    • Rotating Whip Finisher
    • Marabou
    • Yarns
    • Bodkin

    All of the fly tying kits that were mentioned to this point were for freshwater fishing, so it’s a breath of fresh air to announce that we have a kit that's suitable for saltwater fishing. The DDF Beginner Fly tying kit is great to take to the beachy shores as it has specific materials that are made with anti-corrosion in mind.

    Some of these are the Saltwater Saddle,  Asst Stainless Hooks, and CCT Fiber threads. It also has a vast range of materials to make specific flies. These include furs, feathers, chenille, yarn, marabou, flash, and thread, and all items come labeled and with suggested use. 

    The DDF Beginner Fly Tying Kit comes with an impressive vise too. It is strong and can hold hooks with ease. Not to mention, the kit is loaded with 50 hooks, so if you're a beginner, you should have more than enough to keep you busy creating for a while. More experienced fly tiers can use the kits pattern cards as direction and can create their own flies. One thing this kit doesn’t feature is a case. It’s not the end of the world, but it is something to consider before you make the purchase.

    If you’re hoping to catch some bigger species, then you’re in luck. The kit has everything you need to tie flies for trout, panfish, and bass so you can enjoy a successful fishing trip once you master your flies.

    Pros
    • Items come labeled and state their name and use
    • High-quality scissors
    • fly pattern cards as instructions are very helpful
    • Has fly fishing materials
    Cons
    • No case included

    7. Muskoka Lifestyle

    Most Materials Included

    Weight

    0.35 pounds

    Instruction Manual

    No

    Case

    No

    Hook

    No

    Thread

    No

    What’s Included in the Kit?

  • Orange Hackle
  • Goose Biots Variety Color Pack
  • Synthetic Rabbit Hair Dubbing
  • Ringneck Rooster Side Tail Feathers
  • Peacock Hurl
  • Peacock Swords
  • Synthetic Ice Dubbing
    • Black Marabou
    • Light Brown Marabou
    • dark Brown Marabou
    • Olive green Marabou
    • Grey Marabou
    • Black Hackle
    • Olive Hackle
    • Guinea wing feathers
    • Golden rooster Tippet feathers
    • Peacock Blue Plumage
    • Guinea Plumage feathers

    If you have all of the instruments that are needed to make flies, then buying the Muskoka Lifestyle material kit is what you're looking for. When you purchase this kit, you'll get 18 pieces of bulk feathers and dubbing that are packaged in bags or packs. Don't expect a case for all of your materials, as it's not included. The goal of purchasing this kit is it allows you to stock up on all of the feathers and dubbings in many styles and colors.

    The Muskoka lifestyle kit will allow you to create great existing patterns for both wet and dry flies. Some of these are nymphs, streamers, and poppers. You’ll also be able to get creative and make personalized flies suitable for the environment you're hoping to fish in.  It helps that many of the included products are challenging to find elsewhere. So you'll be receiving some truly rare materials. There is simply no limit to what you can do with this kit.

    This kit is great for anglers that may have some or all of their tools already. If you're one of those anglers, then it's better to focus on quality materials by bulk buying all of your stuff together. The quantity is a great saving compared to higher prices for buying each material individually.

    Pros
    • Great for tying wet or dry flies
    • High-quality materials
    • Rare feathers are found in this kit
    • Great value compared to buying separately
    Cons
    • Tools need to be bought separately- not ideal for novice fly tiers

    8. Zephyr Travel

    Best Portable Fly Tying Kit

    Weight

    4.5 pounds

    Instruction Manual

    No

    Case

    Yes

    Hook

    No

    Thread

    No

    What’s Included in the Kit?

    • Two bobbins
    • scissors
    • whip finisher
    • bobbin threader
    • vise
    • hair stacker
    • hackle pliers

    You may be an angler who loves to be on the go. If this is the case, then getting a portable fly tying kit that’s suitable for traveling is one of your needs. The Zephyr Travel Fly Tying Kit is a perfect travel-sized kit that will suit any travelers’ needs.

    The 12-piece kit features some high-quality tools that range from a hair stacker, bobbins, whip finisher and more. They're made of metal, which means that they are durable and corrosion-resistant. You'll also find an EZ Rotary Vise included. Zephyr' vise is specifically great as it provides versatility when wrapping thread and gives a smooth rotation for drying epoxies. The EZ vise is constructed of durable machined stainless steel and aluminum and fits in with all of the tools nicely.

    There's also a beautiful black padded case to keep all of your tools safe and sound. It opens up so you can have a 180-degree view into the case for clear inspection. The organizers on both sides will keep each tool protected, so you don't have to worry about its durability when on the road. This kit has every tool you may need, but bear in mind; you'll need to buy your materials separately. You'll also need to learn to tie flies by yourself or through others as there are no instructions, either.

    Pros
    • All of the essential tools are included
    • High-quality travel bag
    • The tools are a convenient size for traveling
    • Good quality vise included
    Cons
    • No instruction or materials are provided

    Comparing 5 Kinds of Fishing Flies

    Dry Flies (ex. elk hair caddis)

    The Dry Fly is the most common and famous of the types of fly fishing. Dry flies represent insects that fish feed on that land on top of the water. When an angler is making this type of insect, they’ll need to use materials like foam and feathers. A good example of a dry fly is the hair caddis.

    Wet Flies

    A wet fly is a type of artificial fly that goes under the water. Because wet flies are designed to ride beneath the water's surface, these fly patterns often incorporate some sort of weight. An example of a type we fly is a March Brown Wet fly.

    Streamers (ex. Wooly bugger)

    Streamers are bigger flies that you use with your larger sized rods. Anglers expect to be getting bigger, and heavier catches with this fly.  These flies imitate baitfish, crayfish, leeches, and large aquatic insects like hellgrammites. Streamers are the fly-fishing equivalent of conventional lures. When you’re making a streamer, consider starting with a wooly bugger.

    Saltwater Flies

    With saltwater flies, they are way bigger than most freshwater. Because of this, it’s expected to use a hook size that’s 6 and up, rather than 12 and down. Some good examples of saltwater flies are Sand Prawn and itchy Trigger.

    How to Use a Fly Tying Kit

    • How does a fly tying vise work?
      A fly tying vise can either have a pedestal base or a C-clamp base. Either one needs a flat surface to work on so you can mount your fly on the shaft securely. You will be able to move the shaft slightly using a lever. The shaft can taper in and out, and this opens and closes the vise jaws.  Once it’s opened you can place your fly in and begin your work.
    • What is a bodkin used for in fly tying?
      Bodkins are used to free-up tied down hackle fibers and other bound fibers. Their needles are used for threading cords, elastics, or tapes through pre-made holes and tubes.bodkins are the tool of choice for many when it's time to finish flies.
    • How do you use and tie using a whip finisher?
      First, start by holding the handle of the whip finish between your thumb and middle finger. The point of the tool should be pointed right. Draw your bobbin slightly left and upwards without letting the thread slip from either the groove or the point of the tool.Then, move your pointer finger to the handle of the whip finish tool, allowing the tool to swivel around the finishing tool. Your aim is to get the shape of a number 4 here.  This requires a lot of practice, but with time comes precision.
    • How do you use peak rotary vise?
      A peak rotary vise is designed for optimal tying efficiency and ease of adjustment. It works very similarly to a regular vise, but the head of the vise can turn in 360 degrees. The Jaws ride on precision guide rods holding the jaw faces parallel, so there is no damage to the finished fly. This can sometimes be a problem with a regular vise.
    • How do you use a tying tool?
      A tying tool is used to tie a knot on your thread once you’re finished your fly. It’s made to be small and precise to give the angler ultimate control when executing a knot. It’s aimed for anglers who are intermediates at fly tying. Here’s a video demonstration of how it works.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Who makes the best fly tying tools?

    There are many brands to choose from when you’re looking for the best fly tying kit. Some brands are known for specific tools or materials. If you’re looking for a kit that is solely based on tools, then Dr. Slick is a great choice. If you’ve all your tools already, Muskoka is a great brand that specializes in the material only kits. In contrast, DDF has excellent packages that have a mix of materials and tools.

    Is fly tying thread the same as sewing thread?

    No, The threads that are used for fly tying can be composed of nylon, polyester, or mono. These thread properties are more durable and longer-lasting as opposed to sewing thread. The width for fly tying threads differ, too. You can buy threads as thin as 0.033 mm. They can go as high as 0.076 mm.  Sewing thread is made from cotton and just won’t hold up if you get a bite from a large species.

    Is it always cheaper to tie your own flies?

    In Theory, this answer is yes, but many variants come into play when you’re calculating the cost. If you’re buying a cheaper flies in a fish shop, you'll typically spend between $2-$5 on average. If you buy a low-cost kit and make 20 flies, you may see savings. In short,  you'll need to make a large volume before your wallet sees the difference.

    What is the spring for in a fly tying vise?

    The spring holds the materials that you have tied on the hook to the vise. It's called a material spring. It’s a great addition to your vise, enabling you to keep materials like ribbing or hackles out of the way while tying in other materials. Some vises will have this accompanying it, or you can add it to your fly tying vise. So make sure you put the spring to use as it’s the most low tech but helpful you can add to your fly tying vise.

    How much does it cost to make your own flies with a fishing kit?

    Making your own flies differs from the material that's used to the size you'd like. Some anglers prefer to use one of a kind feathers and hairs so their flies will last longer. These obviously increase the cost in its production and can be as high as $5-8 per fly. If you're making small to medium flies, it costs, on average 20 cents - $1 per fly. If you bulk buy your materials instead of buying feathers and hairs in fishing shops, you'll save on your material expenses, and it will be more worth it in the long run.

    How do you tie a saltwater fly?

    When you're tying a fly for the saltwater, it's crucial that you use anti-corrosion materials so it can withstand the environment. Feathers, bucktails, and rabbit strips are the three natural materials fundamental to all saltwater-­fly tiers. They're easily accessible, relatively inexpensive, and can be found in an assortment of colors. The process of making the fly is pretty much the same though, just be sure your materials can withstand salt water, and you'll be good to go!


    Conclusion

    Now that you’ve learned about the best fly-tying kits available in the market today, it’s time to get your kit and to start getting creative. Dr. Slick fly tying kit is beloved by anglers all across the globe for its quality tools and slick design.

    It's why we've made it our top pick, and we're confident you'll love it too. Once you get the materials you need, you'll be ready to start making wet flies, dry flies, wool buggers, and more. You'll be eager to go out and put them to the test on your next fly fishing excursion!