10 Best Fish Finders: Reviews & Comparisons For Serious Anglers

If you are an avid fisherman or competition angler, you know about fish finders. You may not know how valuable they can be for smaller water fishing, kayak, and pontoon boat fishing and ocean fishing.

This article will examine the best fish finders on the market today. We will also explain what to look for when trying to find the ideal model for your specific needs.

Preview

Product

Screen Size

Resolution

Max Depth

Check Price

Humminbird 410950-1NAV HELIX 7 CHIRP MSI...

Humminbird 410950-1NAV Helix 7

7-Inches

800x480 pixels

125 feet

Garmin ECHOMAP UHD 93sv, 9' Keyed-Assist...

Garmin ECHOMAP UHD 93sv

9-Inches

800x600 pixels

100 feet

Humminbird 410210-1 HELIX 5 CHIRP GPS G2 Fish...

Humminbird 410210-1 HELIX 5

5-Inches

800x480 pixels

125 feet

Deeper PRO+ Smart Sonar - GPS Portable...

Deeper PRO+ DP1H10S10

N/A

N/A

260 feet

Hummingbird 410950-1 HELIX 7 CHIRP MSI (MEGA...

Humminbird 410950-1 HELIX 7

5-Inches

800x480 pixels

125 feet

Humminbird, Helix 7, CHIRP MSI GPS G3N

Humminbird, Helix 7 G3N

7-Inches

800x480 pixels

125 feet

Garmin Striker 4 with Portable Kit

Garmin

Striker 4

3.5, 5, 7-Inches

600x480 pixels

700 feet

Marcum LX-7 Ice Fishing Sonar...

MarCum

LX-7

8-Inches

800x600 pixels

300 feet

Humminbird 410160-1 PIRANHAMAX 4 DI (Down...

Humminbird PIRANHAMAX 4 DI

4.3 Inches

272x480 pixels

600 feet

Lowrance HOOK2 5 - 5-inch Fish Finder with...

Lowrance HOOK2 5

5, 7, 9, 12-Inches

800x640 pixels

300 feet

4 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Fish Finder

Before you head out and buy any old fish finder, we have developed these four questions for you to answer. Your answers will help you understand what type of fish finder and what features you need the most.

1. How deep do you fish?

One of the first things you should ask yourself is how deep is the water you generally fish in? The water depth plays a crucial role in the type of fish finder you should use. If you are mainly a deep water angler, then a fish finder with down imaging is best.

For shallow water fishers, you will want to look for a fish finder that uses side imaging. Likewise, if you spend your time split between deep water and shallow water, a multi-image finder should be at the top of your list. While more expensive, a fish finder with both down and side viewing will benefit you the most.

2. How far do you travel to fish?

All fish finders need a power supply. On fixed fish finders that permanently mount to your boat, you will need a few deep cycle marine batteries (12v each) to run the system. However, for kayak fishing or paddleboard fishing, a portable fish finder is needed.

For the portable units, you will need to ensure you have enough battery power to make it to and from the shore without worry of the fish finder dying.

3. How much space do you have available?

Some boat owners don't have any issue with space and can pick any type of fish finder they prefer. However, for those that fish from kayaks, canoes, float tubes, or other limited space options, your options are more limited.

Portable fish finders are ideal for boats and craft with smaller space for mounting or storage. Even if you have a larger boat, you may prefer a portable fish finder for the ease of removal and installation, should you decide to take it with you out on a different fishing vessel.

4. How will you connect the transducer to your kayak?

There are several types of traducers, and each will attach to your boat or kayak differently. You can choose an over-the-edge style transducer that clips to a pole arm and hangs directly in the water near the transom.

You also have options that connect to the hull, through the hull, or transom mounts. The type and size of your boat or vessel will determine the best mounting style and location.


10 Best Fish Finders Reviewed

1. Humminbird 410950-1NAV Helix 7

Our Top Pick

Screen Size

7-Inches

Resolution

800x480 pixels

Max Depth

125 feet

Mounting Options

Transom, hull, through-the-hull

Battery Life

24+ hrs

The Humminbird Helix 7 is easily the best fish finder on the market today. This 7-inch screen beast comes with everything you need to install and start finding. It also boasts several different styles, a couple of which make this list (see below).

This version, the 410950-1 NAV, includes only the Navonics+ (US and Canada configuration). This program is on an SD card and has built-in maps for over 21,000 lakes and waterways in North America. No matter where you go, you will have a map waiting for you.

The transducer is a combination imaging version, so it is best used in any water depths. However, with the advances in the CHIRP sonar, you get a crystal clear view of the water under your boat, extending out 125 feet on each side. You also get clear-view 125 feet straight down.

Schools of fish and larger single fish appear in real-time, and you can watch them move. Know exactly where to cast and when with this guy mounted on your boat. The gimbal mounting bracket is decent, but an aftermarket or 3rd party mount may be more useful.

Humminbird has great customer service, but the 5 and 7-inch screen models only come with a 1-year warranty, starting on the date of purchase. Larger screens include the Humminbird 3-year warranty, so be aware of what you are getting here.

Pros
  • 12-volt fused power supply
  • 125 feet all-angles viewing
  • Excellent customer service
  • Large HD display in all light
  • Navonics+ included
Cons
  • 1-year warranty
  • Buttons may be too sensitive

2. Garmin ECHOMAP UHD 93sv

Top Of The Range GPS Fish Finder

Screen Size

9-Inches

Resolution

800x600 pixels

Max Depth

100 feet

Mounting Options

Transom, hull, through-the-hull

Battery Life

24+ hrs

Garmin is a brand known and trusted around the world. Their fish finders are among the top rated and most reviewed of any brand out there. The EchoMap UHD 93sv is the top of the range fish finder. With a 9-inch touch screen and multi-view set up, it makes finding fish almost too easy.

Once you have the fish finder, installation is fairly straightforward. Transom mounts are the most common, but hull and through-the-hull are also options. It is the initial set up, though, that can get confusing. A lot of first-time users get lost during the initial set up.

Luckily, the step by step process in the owners manual is a lot of help, though you may need to read through it a few times. You also get the Garmin 2-year warranty that will cover the unit if you need to make a claim. Garmin is relatively good at handling customer needs, so don't be afraid to call.

The best feature of this unit, aside from the large touch-screen, is the included LakeView mapping. Details maps and markers are preloaded in to allow you to get to your favorite fishing spot and have a map ready to go.

The GT54 transducer is included and gives you incredible detail to about 100 feet in all directions. Once properly set up, you will be able to find the largest fish and see your line drop right where you want it.

Pros
  • 2-year warranty
  • 12v power supply for long use
  • UHD touch screen with split-view
  • GPS, LakeView, SOS included
Cons
  • Can be challenging to set up
  • Not always in stock

3. Humminbird 410210-1 HELIX 5

Best Fish Finder For The Money

Screen Size

5-Inches

Resolution

800x480 pixels

Max Depth

125 feet

Mounting Options

Transom

Battery Life

24+ hrs

If the Helix 7 is any indication (and it is), the Helix 5 is worthy of the top spot itself. However, with the smaller screen and less imaging, it falls a few places. Included with this model are the 5-inch screen, push-button controls, and built-in GPS.

You can find your way, no matter where you are with the GPS unit. Reliable and easy to use, it also tracks your boat speed so you can keep up with the schools. You will also find a clear-view using the transducer mounted down-view dual beams, wide angle, and high detail at your fingertips.

You can also control which beam to use, or use both for an overlay and even more detail. This model doesn’t have the side view sonar, but it is an optional upgrade if you are curious. The 410210-1 model is ideal for kayaks and canoes and will even work well on smaller fishing boats.

The mount is simple, and set up is a breeze. The 1-year warranty is a little of a downer, but with the reliability of the machine, you most likely won’t need it anyway.

Pros
  • HD display ideal for kayak fishing
  • Simple set up
  • Built-in GPS
  • Autochart stores your markers
Cons
  • 1-year warranty
  • Side-view CHIRP is not included

4. Deeper PRO+ DP1H10S10

Best Castable Fish Finder

Screen Size

N/A

Resolution

N/A

Max Depth

260 feet

Mounting Options

Cast/Drop

Battery Life

5 hrs

If you prefer to stand onshore, or fish from the ice, then a traditional fish finder may not suit your needs. Enter the Deeper Pro+. This castable fish finder connects to your smartphone or tablet to display the water and fish under the surface near where you are.

The finder uses an internal WiFi connection, much like a hotspot. You connect your phone to the signal and use it as your display screen. This device is easily cast over 330 feet and will send images back to you from depths of 260 feet down.

Using the bathymetric mapping system, you can get a layout of the lake or river bottom and know exactly where to cast depending on the type of fish you are after. The fish ID isn't the greatest, and learning what you are looking at on the display takes a little getting used to.

Once you do, though, you will wonder how you ever fished without it. With 15 scans per second in both narrow and wide beam angles, you get a detailed view of the floor, vegetation, fish, and currents. You can even download maps or create your own.

Pros
  • Bathymetric mapping system is easy to use
  • Maps and markers saved to the cloud
  • Easy to cast
  • Ideal for shore and ice fishing
Cons
  • Can drain your smartphone battery fast
  • 1-year warranty

5. Humminbird 410950-1 HELIX 7

Best Fish Finder For Crappie

Screen Size

5-Inches

Resolution

800x480 pixels

Max Depth

125 feet

Mounting Options

Transom, hull, through-the-hull

Battery Life

24+ hrs

The Helix 7 makes another appearance here (see our top pick for more). This version, the 410950-1, Doesn’t include the Navonics+ system.

You still get the HD full-color display with side and down angle views. The CHIRP sonar works well in both wide and narrow beams to overlay and give you unprecedented detail and clarity.

Unfortunately, you only get the standard 1-year warranty. However, with the Humminbird customer service, any issues are easily handled and within reason.

Without the Navonics+ system, you won't be able to store or load maps of your favorite fishing holes. If you want to save a bit of money, though, it isn’t a bad loss. The smaller screen is ideal for kayak fishing and can be viewed in any light. It is a great deal on one of the best brands on the market.

Pros
  • Simple installation
  • High definition display
  • Side and down angle views
  • 12-volt fused power supply
Cons
  • No Navonics+
  • 1-year warranty

6. Humminbird, Helix 7 G3N

Best Fish Finder Under $1000

Screen Size

7-Inches

Resolution

800x480 pixels

Max Depth

125 feet

Mounting Options

Transom, hull, through-the-hull

Battery Life

24+ hrs

For the angler that needs to have it all, the Humminbird Helix 7 G3N is the top of the top. Just like our top pick, this is the best fish finder under $1000. You will find it has additional features compared to the top pick, though. The additional cost is what keeps this model from the number 1 spot.

The G3N model gives you everything the Helix 7 comes with, including the 7-inch display, full spectrum CHRIP side and down angle sonar, and all the mapping, plotting, and tracking software.

The difference here is that the G3N connects to the Humminbird network. You can install multiple units to have them connect through the network and keep up with past and present fishing spots. You can even connect with other anglers on the water and find the best spots for everyone.

Pros
  • G3N network capable
  • Simple installation
  • High definition display
  • Side and down angle views
  • 12-volt fused power supply
Cons
  • 1-year warranty
  • More expensive than other models

7. Garmin Striker 4

Best Kayak Fish Finder

Screen Size

3.5, 5, 7-Inches

Resolution

600x480 pixels

Max Depth

700 feet

Mounting Options

Float, hull

Battery Life

24+ hrs

The Garmin Striker 4 is the baseline for almost all fish finders. It has features that you desire, a few you didn't even know you need, and all on a compact portable design. It is designated as the best fish finder for kayak fishing and works incredibly well for canoe and paddleboard fishing as well.

The float mount transducer includes CHIRP sonar for detailed views. You can even use split-screen mode to view sonar readings and GPS tracking. Everything is contained in a waterproof cover that comes free of charge with your purchase.

If you have a larger boat or want a larger screen, the Striker 4 comes in three sizes. The standard 3.5-inch display is ideal for shore fishing, ice fishing, or on your canoe or kayak. The 5- and 7-inch screens will work well in all other aspects.

The transducer comes with a suction cup for use on the hull of your boat. It also attaches to a float for shore fishing. If you enjoy being on the ice or doing some vertical jigging, the Garmin Striker 4 will be your new best friend.

You also get the GPS and mapping features Garmin is known for, and with a dedicated 12v battery, you can fish all day and all night without worry of running out of power.

Pros
  • Dual mount system
  • Water temperature sensor included
  • Three display sizes to choose from
  • Simple installation and set up
Cons
  • Suction cup mount must be tied off
  • 1-year warranty

8. MarCum LX-7

Best Ice Fishing Fish Finder

Screen Size

8-Inches

Resolution

800x600 pixels

Max Depth

300 feet

Mounting Options

Drop

Battery Life

Up to 12 hrs

If you are an avid ice angler, you are going to love the MarCum LX-7. This fish finder is simple to operate, easy to learn how to read, and will have you catching fish in no time. The all-inclusive design even includes the battery.

Zip up the red pouch and head out to your favorite ice hole (or dig a new one!) and drop the transducer in the hole. With 8 and 20 degree sonar ranges, you will get access to depths up to 300 feet. The system will also automatically adjust to the transducer angle, current, and view options.

The battery is a 12v sealed battery. However, it is a small cell design. Fully charged (charger included), the unit can last up to 12 hours. However, some reports from avid uses state they get a maximum of 7 or 8 hours constant use.

The 8-inch display covers everything, from dual views to jigging and flash screens. You can go vertical or find your underwater current and track those cold trophies from anywhere. It also comes with a 2-year warranty to cover everything except the battery.

The one downside is that the transducer is a drop line that only has about 2-foot of cord. While you don’t need to worry about it getting lost or snagged, it may not be deep enough at all times to get accurate bottom readings.

Pros
  • All-inclusive design
  • 2-year warranty provided
  • Compact to take anywhere
  • Ideal for vertical jigging
  • Multiple sonar display options
Cons
  • Small cell battery can run down fast
  • Transducer drop is 2-feet

9. Humminbird PIRANHAMAX 4 DI

Best Cheap Fish Finder

Screen Size

4.3 Inches

Resolution

272x480 pixels

Max Depth

600 feet

Mounting Options

Transom, hull

Battery Life

24+ hrs

If you are looking for a reliable brand and want the best while saving money, Humminbird has the fish finder you are looking for. The brand is well known for being experts in their field. Their fish finders consistently rank among the best.

They also cater to all budgets. The best cheap fish finder is the Piranhamax 4 DI. It has a compact screen and loses the Helix series's HD quality, but it doesn't take away from being able to spot fish.

On larger boats or when sharing with others, the 4.3-inch screen might be a little small. For kayak fishing or other personal vessels, it installs easily, and the wireless display is plenty of viewing space. It even displays well in full sunlight.

The transom mounting is easy enough, but you can use the transducer in the hull as well. With the available options, high-resolution sonar and CHIRP technology, you get a fish finder that is durable, water-resistant (proof according to IPX7 standards) and affordable.

Pros
  • Easy to use controls
  • Excellent down imaging range
  • FishID+ included
  • Fish alarms pinpoint hot spots
Cons
  • 1-year warranty
  • Screen may be too small for larger vessels

10. Lowrance HOOK2 5

Best Fish Finder Under $500

Screen Size

5, 7, 9, 12-Inches

Resolution

800x640 pixels

Max Depth

300 feet

Mounting Options

Transom

Battery Life

24+ hrs

If you want a mid-range fish finder at low-range prices, the Lowrance Hook2 5 is the model for you. The best fish finder under $500 doesn't disappoint. You can select from various display sizes, but the 5-inch is the best deal, dollar for dollar.

You get the display in full color and UHD resolution. With split-screen capabilities, detail mapping, and fish ID, it is one of the easiest finders to use, making it an even better deal. The best feature is the TripleShot transducer.

With this model, you get down angle, side angle, and CHIRP in one transducer. You can single them out or overlay for a high-detail and easily identifiable fish-arch. Not to mention accurate results to 300 feet in all directions.

The one downfall to this model is the company itself. Lowrance caters to the budget-friendly fisherman, but it seems their customer service is where the savings lack. While you won't need to call or email often, if ever, when you do, it can be a tedious and drawn-out process.

Aside from that, all aspects of this fish finder are precisely what you would expect, and it is considered a top-buy with rave reviews.

Pros
  • Easy to install and use
  • Upgraded software and mapping with SD card
  • UHD display in 4 sizes
  • Wide and deep reach of 300 feet
Cons
  • Customer service is dismal
  • 1-year warranty

More Buying Considerations with Fish Finders

When you are thinking of which fish finder to purchase, the below factors can help. Each decision factor is worthy of serious consideration.

Mounting Type

There are three major mounting types to consider. Which one works best for you is a personal preference based on your abilities, equipment, and where you fish.

  • Mountable/Fixed
    Mounted fish finders are generally used in boats and larger watercraft. Transom mounts and pole mounts are the most common. If you go this route, dedicated batteries and permanent mounting are needed.
  • Portable/Handheld
    Portable fish finders can be mounted but are generally placed in a cup holder, pole holder, or an aftermarket mounting stand. These are the preferred fish finder for kayak, canoe, and paddleboard anglers.
  • Castable/Wireless
    Wireless fish finders are used for shore fishing, kayak, and paddleboard fishing. Most of these fish finders work with a mobile app and connects to your phone as the view screen. They tend to have less battery life and need to be retrieved. For an inexpensive option that works in small areas, though, they are a fan favorite.

Power Source

The power supply needed for most fish finders is going to be 12 volts. This requires a dedicated battery. Most anglers opt for a 12 v deep cycle marine battery.

Higher-end finders come with a battery supply, usually rechargeable. However, larger units and permanent units need to be wired into the boat power supply, or dedicated batteries need to be available.

Some finders require more power (12, 24, or 36 volts). In this case, it is best to use a series of 12 volt batteries to bring the total volts into parameters for the finders.

Transducer

Transducer beams are essential to the fish finder abilities.  Cone angles are wider, see more but are much slower. A beam angle is a narrow sight area but is faster and more accurate. The best transducers use a combination angle that has cone and beam angles at the same time.

transducer

Display Screen

The display screen is an important factor, as well. Older models have small, low-resolution screens. More expensive and modern models have full-color screens. Some displays are also split-screen when there is more than one input angle from the transducer.

The better pixel ratio, the higher the screen resolution. Colored displays and backlit displays allow you to see in any light or even at night.

CHIRP vs. Traditional Sonar

Traditional sonar has been used for decades. It uses a single pulse with high power but takes a long time to get a decent picture. In the last decade, CHIRP sonar has introduced shorter but more frequent pulses. The result is a wider, more defined sonar image.

CHIRP Vs. Traditional Sonar

CHIRP sonar transmit at more ranges and frequencies and does so using less power. Traditional sonars our still in use and being produced because they are cheaper. But it is worth the few extra dollars to upgrade to CHIRP.

Performance Features

Another factor to look at is the additional performance features. Many brands will add other features or unique benefits to make their models more attractive. Controls for frequency and accuracy, for example, are small features that can be overlooked.

Visibility and viewing angles may be selectable, but a display screen that shows them together has a huge advantage. Storage space (SD or MicroSD), network connectivity, and WiFi are also features that are worth investing in.

Price & Warranty

Finally, you will want to understand the total price. Shipping, taxes, and of course, any accessories that are wanted or needed will go into your budget planning. You also need to read the warranty details carefully.

Warranties protect your investment against manufacturing defects, issues that can arise during regular use, and other unforeseen problems. However, the coverage period, exact items covered, and claim requirements will differ. Make sure you know what you are getting into.


How Fish Finders Work & Why Anglers Use Them

Anglers use fish finders because they give you the advantage of seeing under the surface to find fish. You also get to see bottom contours, water depth, and other underwater obstacles.

Fish finders work by sending a sonar pulse through the water. The pulse bounces off of fish, debris, and the bottom. The transducer records how long it takes for the pulse to return and visually displays the results on the screen.


Fish Finder Pricing Guide

Fish finders generally fall in 4 price ranges. The sub-$100 fish finders are small, don't have a lot of additional features, and may not work for large boats. Mounting can be an issue as well, but they work.

In the $100 - $200 range, you begin to get better display and mounting options as well as more options and features. The displays and mounts are still not the best, but they last longer than the cheaper range.

For the finder in the $300 to $500 range, you will find the most features, best displays, and most brands will offer extended warranties, accessories, and other beneficial items. For those that cost $500 or more, the best of the best come out. Only professional anglers tend to go for this price point, constant anglers and intermediate fishers will find the best deal in a cheaper range.


Brand Comparison: Garmin vs. Humminbird vs. Lowrance

When it comes to brand comparison, Humminbird is easily on top of almost every list. The bran is innovative, producing the first side-view and 360-degree sonar. However, the top spot also comes at a high cost.

Garmin is a brand that doesn’t specialize and rounds out fairly above average. The brand is affordable for most budgets and performs well in the real world. They do lack some of the high-end sophistication, but for novice and advanced anglers, Garmin is usually enough.

Lowrance is a cost-effective solution for beginning fishers and anglers trying out fish finders for the first time. You won't see a lot of innovation, but the finders work, have a lot of accessories, and are affordable for any budget.

Other brands to consider are Eagle, which compares to higher-end Lowrance models. You may also be interested in iBobber, the floating wireless and castable fish finder.


Tips for Installing a Fish Finder for Boat or Kayak

Installing your fish finder gives you a lot of options. The most common boat installation is a transom install on the outside of the starboard hull. The through-hull install is the most meticulous but also the most reliable.

You can also use a pole mount if you are on a kayak, and keep the transducer in the water while fishing. Keep in mind that the battery and display mounting locations need to be planned out before making any permanent decisions.


How to Read a Fish Finder Screen

Reading a fish finder screen can take a bit of practice. For higher-end models with Fish-ID, the fish are turned into fish-shaped icons. For other models, you need to learn to identify the smaller V's, or arches, that appear on the display.

Displays in color are easier to learn on, and you can distinguish between the floor, debris, and fish. The fish arches can show you the width and length of the fish, in general terms. With enough practice, you can find those trophy fish out of the masses below your boat.


Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best Lowrance fish finder?

One of the best Lowrance fish finders is the Hook2 5. The 5-inch display and simple controls give you great views of the underwater scene below your boat. You also get triple sonar views along with detailed US coastline mapping preinstalled.

What is the best Garmin fish finder?

The title for best Garmin fish finder is a little bit more complicated. The Striker 4 is worthy of that title. With multiple screen sizes to choose from, along with CHIRP sonar, you can take it with you on any fishing trip. It also works well for vertical jigging and ice fishing readings.

What is the best Humminbird fish finder?

The Humminbird Helix7 is easily the best Humminbird fish finder on the market right now. With a 7-inch high res screen, dual GPS and transducers, built-in coastal maps, and all mounting hardware and accessories included, it is the best in a long list of great finders.

What is the ideal screen size for a fish finder?

Screen size is a debate that will go on forever. For most instances, you will want a screen size that is about 7-inches in size. Less than 5 inches and they become difficult to see and have glare issues in direct sunlight. Over 7 inches, and you run into mounting and storage issues. For most watercraft, a 7-inch screen is ideal.

Are all fish finders waterproof and weatherproof?

Actually, no. Fish finders have waterproof parts, like the transducer, and most of the connections are weatherproof. The displays and batteries, though, are generally weather-resistant and not much more. Some brands will market waterproof systems, but they only refer to the parts of the system that go underwater.

Which is better, down imaging or side imaging?

The answer depends on the type of fishing you are doing. Deepwater fishing will benefit from down imaging, as will catfishing, ice fishing, and jigging. For shallow water, shore fishing, kayak fishing, and pier fishing, a side imaging system is better.

Are there any other necessary accessories to use with my fish finder?

When using a fish finder, there are several other things you may want to consider. You will catch a lot more fish, so you need to be prepared. Underwater fishing cameras pair well with fish finders, so you get an even better idea of what's under your hull. Of course, reeling in that trophy fish requires some stamina and good footing. The right boat shoes will help with that. Cleaning your fish requires a good fishing knife, and a handheld GPS unit will come in handy when you need to get back to that honey hole.

What is the easiest fish finder to use?

The ease of fish finders is relative to your experience and knowledge. If you have never used a fish finder before, Garmin and Lowrance make beginner-friendly models with minimal controls and are easy to read. If you have used fish finders in the past, learning new technologies like CHIRP can change the learning curve, but Humminbird and Garmin also make fairly intuitive displays with controls that are simple to use and won’t take long to master.

Where is the best place to buy these fish finders, fish finder mounts, and other angling accessories?

The best place to buy fish finders and their accessories will be either through the respective brand's website or through Amazon. Both places will have a good quantity in stock, but Amazon will also have older models that may not be for sale through the company sites any longer. You can get great deals on new-in-box models and accessories through the 3rd party vendor site.


Conclusion

Fish finders make finding and following schools and trophy fish easier. Choosing the right brand, size, and model for your specific needs can be challenging. For those still on the fence, a modern finder with CHIRP technology, large display, and simple mounting options is the best bet.

For those reasons, we highly recommend you take a second look at the Humminbird Helix 7. It has everything you need to connect the finder and get on the water with expert finding technologies right out of the box.