9 Best Baitcasting Reels Under $100 Reviewed

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Baitcasting reels are great for casting long distances and landing a lure in a precise location. They also have more power than spinning reels usually do. But to take advantage of all these benefits, the right baitcaster is necessary.

Bass fishing with crankbaits and trout fishing with a lightweight reel are both bound to be more successful with a baitcaster. There’s no need to spend a fortune on a reel, either. Read through this guide to good cheap baitcasting reels to avoid shoddy imitations and still spend less than $100.

Preview

Model

Gear Ratio

Max Drag

Check Price

KastKing Royale Legend Baitcasting...

KastKing Royale Legend - Elite Series

8.1:1

17.65 lbs.

Abu Garcia PMAX3-L Pro Max Low-Profile...

Abu Garcia Pro Max

7.1:1

18 lbs.

Pflueger President XT Low Profile Reel

Pflueger President XT

7.2:1

12 lbs.

KastKing Speed Demon Pro Baitcasting Fishing...

KastKing Speed Demon Pro

9.3:1

13.2 lbs.

Shimano Caenan 150 A HG Right Hand...

Shimano Caenan A

6.3:1

11 lbs.

Lew's Speed Spool LFS Baitcasting Reels

Lew’s Speed Spool LFS

5.6:1

15 lbs.

Cadence CB8 Baitcasting Reels, 6.7oz Ultra...

Cadence CB8

7.3:1

20 lbs.

Piscifun Phantom Carbon Baitcasting Reel -...

Piscifun Phantom Carbon

7.0:1

17 lbs.

Abu Garcia 6500 Ambassadeur S Round Baitcast...

Abu Garcia Ambassadeur S Round

5.1:1

11 lbs.


Why Invest in a Baitcasting Reel?

Many fear switching from their trusty spinning reel to the more complex baitcaster. But if you really want full control over your line no matter what lure you use or what conditions you use it in, there's no choice but to use a baitcaster.

Spinning reels are limited in terms of power because they accommodate less line than baitcasters and tend to have less drag. Baitcasters are better for larger fish. Rather than a bail, baitcasters rely on the angler's thumb to limit the line. The braking system helps reduce backlash for untrained thumbs. Freshwater anglers who want to place a lure in a particular location or continue fishing in the high wind will find it's much better doing so with a baitcaster.


What Makes A Good Baitcasting Reel Under $100

Type of Fish & Environment

There's not a limit to which freshwater fish you can target with a baitcaster. Saltwater usually causes more corrosion in casters since they’re harder to clean, but some models are rated and protected for saltwater fishing.

Trout with light line, bass with medium to heavy test, and catfish or muskie with the heaviest test all work on a baitcasting reel. Different models and styles of baitcasters will have different levels of success with different lures and targets, though.

Reel Features

Many of the latest baitcasters are lighter to remain comfortable over long periods. The material of the reel helps reduce weight, with most of the light or ultralight styles coming in graphite or graphite composite builds. The best baitcasting reels under $100 have frames that are a single piece, making them stronger and more durable.

Spool size is usually larger in baitcasters, making them better for trolling and holding heavier line. Higher gear ratios and retrieval rates allow them to gather this line in faster. More on baitcaster gear ratios and retrieve rate later.

Reel Profile

In addition to low-profile models, there are also round baitcasters. These styles are kind of a league of their own, usually operated in a similar way to other baitcasters but offering more power in the drag and gears. Round casters commonly accommodate more and heavier test lines, making them great for trolling with an A-rig.

Any larger bait works better on round reels, which won't betray as much torque to the angler's hands during a fight with a fish. To handle more line and heavy lures, round reels themselves are generally heavier than other baitcasters.

Drag System & Retrieve Rate

In a drag system, plates press on the spool to prevent a fish from running away with the line and prevent the line from breaking. Baitcasters have their drag dials on the side, sometimes star-shaped. Spinning reels typically have drag adjustment on the front or back of the reel.

Front drag tends to have larger disc plates, and rear drag is easier to get to. Retrieve rate is the length of line that comes in per turn of the handle. It’s a more direct description than gear ratio. Reels with the same ratio can have different retrieval rates.

Ball Bearings

While they aren't the only thing that makes a reel run smoothly, ball bearings are an essential part of it. They can be in the handle, supporting the pinion, or dispersed in between other moving parts to reduce friction and prevent wear-down.

The most expensive baitcaster will have tons of ball bearings, and they may be made of fancy materials like ceramic. Most have stainless steel bearings, and budget models opt for well-placed bearings rather than a high number of them. Bearings can be shielded or double-shielded to prevent debris or corrosive elements from entering.  

Brake System

  • Centrifugal
    Gravity allows the line out according to the strength of the cast. The energy of the cast engages centrifugal brakes that extend to apply pressure at the start of a cast.
  • Magnetic
    These systems use magnets that the user can engage before the cast to apply pressure. They are more useful on slow-moving spools at the end of a cast.
  • Combined Braking System
    Both magnets and centrifugal brakes are used in these systems, allowing the angler to take advantage of centrifugal brakes at the beginning of the cast and magnet brakes at the end.

Tension Adjustment

Spools behave differently according to how much tension is applied to them. This tension can be adjusted with a simple dial to give the angler more control over how much line comes off the spool during a cast. Although similar to the braking system, it is different.

Think of tension as what the spool would do if the brakes weren’t there. Used in tandem with the braking system, tension can go a long way in helping to avoid that dreaded baitcaster backlash.

Comfort

The design of the reel may lead to hand fatigue over a long day of fishing. The thumb bar can be plastic, or it can be made of a cushioning material like rubber. The handle itself might have cork or synthetic grips, or it could have plastic tips. Oversized handles can improve grip and give additional torque.

Left-handed reels are sometimes used by right-handed anglers who want to cast with their right hand and not switch the rod over after the cast. Some folks prefer just to throw right-handed and switch the rod before they start reeling in.

Line Capacity

Anglers should aim to have plenty of line on the reel just in case a fish goes on a run. If you want to take advantage of baitcasters’ superior castability, you’ll want to have more line. Baitcasters can also handle heavier test, so you'll want a higher line capacity for a larger diameter line as well. 

Fancier line rigging like leaders and mono backing for braid line will be much easier if you have some extra room to work with. Winding the spool about ¾ full can also help prevent backlash, and a larger line capacity makes doing so easier.

Price & Warranty

Everything in this guide is a bargain at less than $100, but that doesn't mean they're all equal. Some cut costs by using aluminum over graphite, which can affect longevity. Others leave out ball bearings or other design features. Some of them manage to come in under the 100 mark leaving almost nothing out, but that all have their advantages to consider.

Warranties on reels are generally limited, or manufacturers, warranties. The buyer is generally guarded against damage caused in the manufacturing process. Check with the particular seller before you buy just to make sure.


9 Best Baitcasting Reels Under $100 Reviewed

1. KastKing Royale Legend - Elite Series

Our Top Pick!

Reel Weight

7.2 oz.

Gear Ratio

8.1:1

Line Capacity

130/12

Ball Bearings

11 + 1

Max Drag

17.65 lbs.

Key Feature

Versatility

The Elite KastKing Royale baitcasters are perfect for beginners and more experienced anglers who cast middleweight and heavy lures out for bass and inshore shallow saltwater fishing. Adjusting the brakes and drag system is simple, making it easy for newcomers to learn and a cinch for more experienced anglers to use effectively. Tournament anglers love the versatility of this reel because it suits swapping out baits and casting out hundreds of times in a single day.

Eposeidon, the company that makes KastKing, touts its concentration on low cost and high performance, and that really comes through in the construction of this reel. It has a durable graphite frame with the smallest profile on offer from KastKing and an aluminum main gear that has been heat-treated for additional strength without spoiling the light weight. Stainless steel in the kick lever and main shaft allows the Royale Legend Elite to perform like a much costlier reel.

In terms of operation, the whole reel moves smoothly and fairly quietly. The thumb bar feels sturdy, and you can feel the magnet system working through the cast, rather than kicking in at the end. It will cast a long distance, even for a baitcaster, and it has a powerful drag for a reel with such a high gear ratio. Slower ratios like 5.3:1 and 6.6:1 are available in their own unique colors. The attached side cover and great casting allow the user to concentrate on fishing.

Pros
  • Small profile
  • Light graphite frame
  • Durable construction
  • Smooth Action
  • Attached side cover
Cons
  • Not great for ultralight rods & lures

2. Abu Garcia Pro Max

Runner Up

Reel Weight

7.3 oz.

Gear Ratio

7.1:1

Line Capacity

Mono: 145/12

 Braid: 140/30

Ball Bearings

7 + 1

Max Drag

18 lbs.

Key Feature

Castability

Abu Garcia has crafted an excellent reel for frogging and lightweight lures with their Pro Max reel line. The gear ratio is fast but not too fast, granting enough speed on the reel-in without making it unwieldy for light lures.

What it retains in its drag power makes it a fine reel for largemouth bass, pike, and similar targets. Smooth casting and reeling, thanks in part to its eight ball bearings, and fairly good handle grips help get fish in the boat without wearing out anglers' hands over longer fishing outings. A recessed reel foot and bent handle gives additional torque in case the fish wants a fight.

Any kind of lures from swimbait to cranks to worms, weightless or not, cast a long distance smoothly with the Pro Max thanks not only to the braking system but also to the machined-aluminum spool. It might take some adjustment and experience to keep it from backlashing in free spool, but it’s built solidly and constructed for longevity.

The line capacity could be higher, but it's already better than run-of-the-mill baitcasters. If you want to use this reel for frogging, nothing less than 65-pound test braid is going to get the job done, and this one can hold enough for almost any scenario you'll get into while you're out casting frogs. All-graphite and one single piece, the frame adds strength to this reel, which will surely last numerous seasons with the right upkeep.

Pros
  • Strong drag system
  • Continuous brake engagement
  • Fast gear ratio
  • One-piece graphite frame
  • Long-lasting
Cons
  • So-so line capacity

3. Pflueger President XT

Best Low Profile Baitcasting Reel Under 100

Reel Weight

6.8 oz.

Gear Ratio

7.2:1

Line Capacity

Mono: 145/12, 125/14, 100/17

 Braid: 185/20, 140/30, 100/50

Ball Bearings

9

Max Drag

12 lbs.

Key Feature

Ease of use

If you're looking for the best low profile baitcasting reel under 100, look no further. It's a workhorse with broad appeal, great for topwater buzz bait, spoons and spinners, or even trolling. With adjustments to the superb magnet braking system, it's possible to cast this baitcasting reel without needing to thumb the spool at all. The narrower profile and lightness of the reel make it ideal for balancing with the right baitcasting rod to go after bass, salmon, steelhead, and more.

The President XT has a pretty fast gear ratio, but the important thing to look at is its retrieval rate. Pulling in 31 inches of line with every turn of the handle, this reel is great for pulling up a drop shot lure or bringing a tough fish back to the boat quickly. It's also a well-designed reel. The placement of the knobs, length of the handle, and general palmability combine to put everything an angler needs right at hand.

The aluminum handle has nice cork tips that'll prevent hand fatigue, and although it might not have all the torque of a bent handle, it can still pull in fish. Overall, the winding and casting are both even and effortless, and the reel barely makes a sound unless the target really grabs hold of the line.

Pros
  • Versatile
  • Great retrieval rate
  • Comfortable cork handle tips
  • Quiet operation
  • Lightweight
Cons
  • Less torque in the handle

4. KastKing Speed Demon Pro

Best High Speed Baitcasting Reel Under 100

Reel Weight

6.5 oz.

Gear Ratio

9.3:1

Line Capacity

160/12, 140/14

Ball Bearings

12 + 1

Max Drag

13.2 lbs.

Key Feature

Fast gear ratio

As the name implies, this reel’s gear ratio is really, really fast for a reel of any brand or price. Most KastKing baitcasting reels are known for their well-rounded usability, but this one is more specialized for fast lures and ripping crankbaits quickly through vegetation.

Even when it’s moving at its top speed, this reel remains quiet thanks to the whopping thirteen total double-shielded stainless steel ball bearings inside and the specially built interior components. The Speed Demon’s brass gears were cut using a precision hobbing machine to fit flush and move fluidly with the strong, corrosion-resistant aluminum spool.

The whole body of this reel has been built to be as light as possible. The frame, including the side plates, handle, and drag star, are all constructed of carbon fiber. An ingeniously designed main shaft has been split to support the spool from both sides rather than running through from end to end like most other baitcasters.

Splitting the main shaft and supporting it with ball bearings allows it to keep moving smoothly at any speed while reducing the total weight and removing drag from the shaft to allow for longer, unimpeded casting.

The drag is powerful enough, and the braking system has nine magnets to make it customizable. While it is more specialized than most budget baitcasting reels from KastKing, the Speed Demon Pro has been rated for both saltwater and freshwater, which adds versatility that many competing reels don’t have.

Pros
  • Ultralight
  • Nearly noiseless
  • Unique design
  • Saltwater & freshwater rated
  • Well-built
Cons
  • Could use more drag

5. Shimano Caenan A

Best Bass Reel Under $100

Reel Weight

7.2 oz.

Gear Ratio

6.3:1

Line Capacity

120/10, 110/12, 90/14

Ball Bearings

4 + 1

Max Drag

11 lbs.

Key Feature

Sleek design

That's right; even the lauded Shimano company has a reasonably cheap baitcaster. There's a lot to break down in this robust and smooth-running reel. Shimano has built it with tons of high-quality parts and some neat design features, like the die-casted aluminum spool that has been balanced to reduce vibration during casting and reeling.

This reel also has a drag system featuring a dedicated ball bearing that functions a lot like the anti-reverse bearing on other baitcasters does, although it works wonders preventing backward winding. The body of the reel is made of a graphite composite material that looks sharp and should last a long time. It isn't a single-piece frame, but it still feels sturdy.

Whether or not you already know how to use a baitcaster backlash is likely of great concern. This Shimano operates with a centrifugal brake system that forces weights out toward the spool at the beginning of the cast to avoid backlash and retracts them when the spool slows down to allow for longer, more controlled casts.

The gear ratio is mid-range, which is excellent for jigs, crankbaits, and swimbaits. It's especially useful for jerkbait when bass are actively feeding and on the lookout for baitfish. You might want a bit more drag power if you happen to hook a largemouth five pounds or above, but all in all, this Shimano is a good dependable reel and a great budget baitcasting reel for bass.

Pros
  • Great centrifugal braking system
  • Reduced spool vibration
  • Backlash control
  • Effective bearing placement
  • Mid-range gear ratio
Cons
  • Not a single-piece frame
  • Short on drag power

6. Lew’s Speed Spool LFS

Best Baitcaster Reel for the Money

Reel Weight

7.2 oz.

Gear Ratio

5.6:1

Line Capacity

140/12

Ball Bearings

9 + 1

Max Drag

15 lbs.

Key Feature

Easy maintenance

Rather than cut out some of the great features most expensive baitcasters have, this Lew's reel keeps them and even adds a few of its own. It has a single-piece aluminum frame that's lightweight and comfortable, and it also has a bearing-supported pinion with reduced friction so the gears won't wear down.

The whole reel operates smoothly during casting and reeling. There are ten stainless steel bearings, much more than the majority of reels, even among the best budget baitcasters. All the bearings are double-shielded to keep out debris and corrosive material like salt.

The Speed Spool LFS is easy to maintain thanks to its external lube port, which allows the user to add a drop or two of lubricant from time to time. Add some oil in as needed once or twice a season, and the reel will continue to glide when the line goes out.

A bowed handle gives some torque for fighting fish, but beware that the drag is a bit more limited than some other baitcasters, so you might have to make up for it with heavier test. This reel holds a good amount of line, so you can still use mono backing or a lighter test leader. There's an audible click in the drag star so you can put out multiple lines at once, but it can add some noise when casting sometimes. It's worth a little noise to get the best baitcaster reel for the money.

Pros
  • One-piece frame
  • External lube port
  • Smooth casting
  • Bearing-support pinion
  • Bowed handle
Cons
  • Noisy casting
  • Less drag power

7. Cadence CB8

Best Baitcaster for Beginners Under $100

Reel Weight

6.7 oz.

Gear Ratio

7.3:1

Line Capacity

Mono: 120/12

 Braid: 140/30

Ball Bearings

9 + 1

Max Drag

20 lbs.

Key Feature

Perfect for learning

A dependable braking system like the one on this Cadence baitcasting reel will help beginners learn how to cast without dampening their spirits with countless backlashes. There aren't tons of different knobs and dials to confuse anyone trying to get the hang of baitcasters, just a spool tension knob, brake dial, and drag star. With more drag than most of the competition, this reel will help anglers of all experience levels fight some pretty sizable targets.

The frame of the reel is graphite, the main gears are brass, and most of the remaining parts are lightweight aluminum. Oversized handles will help newcomers keep a grip, even if the reel gets wet. Learning to cast into the wind or throw light lures is relatively easy with this reel.

It’s small enough and comfortable enough to use that it won’t get in the way or make more complicated fishing methods untenable. With the easy access afforded by the side plate, it’s also easy to learn how to take apart and clean a baitcaster reel with this model.

There is some of that infamous baitcaster gear noise with some of these reels, but it's not overpowering, and it certainly doesn't stop this reel from being one of the best casting baitcasters for those just getting started.

Pros
  • Easy to take apart
  • Fewer backlashes
  • Powerful drag
  • Comfortable handle
  • One-piece frame
Cons
  • Slight gear grinding noise

8. Piscifun Phantom Carbon

Best Lightweight Baitcaster Under $100

Reel Weight

5.7 oz.

Gear Ratio

7.0:1

Line Capacity

Mono: 120/10

 Braid: 120/30

Ball Bearings

6 + 1

Max Drag

17 lbs.

Key Feature

Ultralightweight

For the trout and panfish angler, this ultralight baitcaster pairs great with a light rod for fishing finesse lures and going after smaller targets. You can even chase down smallies and sunfish with this lightweight baitcaster and some minnows and crankbaits.

The casting is smooth, thanks to the combination magnet and centrifugal braking system. If you tend to spend many long hours at a time out on the water, this reel will stay comfortable the whole time thanks to its lightness and a rubber insert on the thumb bar. 

Inside the reel, a well-crafted anodized aluminum alloy main shaft and gear rotate easily and pose no interruption during casting and reeling. Between the solid interior construction and the 4-disc carbon fiber drag, the Piscifun Phantom has a surprising amount of fish-stopping power for such a light reel.

A clicker tension knob allows control over the spool and an alert if there should be any action on the line while your setup is stored in a rod holder. If you like a little more anchoring at the end of your rod, you might prefer a heavier reel. But for trout and river anglers, this is the best baitcaster for light lures you can find on the market.

Pros
  • Comfortable to use
  • Sizable drag power
  • Smooth casting
  • Hybrid braking system
  • Clicker tension knob
Cons
  • Better suited for small targets

9. Abu Garcia Ambassadeur S Round

Cheap Baitcasting Reel Under $100 - Budget Option

Reel Weight

11.10 oz. (6500)

Gear Ratio

5.1:1

Line Capacity

Mono: 255/17

 Braid: 350/30

Ball Bearings

2

Max Drag

11 lbs.

Key Feature

Line capacity

If you want to get into baitcasting, or just want to see what all the fuss is about, without spending too much money, then this round-style baitcaster is for you. It’s not exactly the same as the more traditional style of baitcaster reel, but it will give you the same feeling. More importantly, it has enough power and functionality to net you some fish.

While it can cast pretty well because of its reliable 4-pin centrifugal braking system, this reel shines when it comes to trolling. That's due in large part to its ability to hold lots more line, mono or braid, than just about any competing baitcaster. It might shock and surprise some readers to see only two ball bearings inside this Abu Garcia, but rest assured that they are well-placed to provide smooth reeling.

If you’re into casting as far as possible, you may want to take a look at some of the other casting baitcasters in this guide. But if you're more interested in placing the lure exactly where you want it, say near some cover or in some vegetation, then this reel will suit you just fine. A bent handle and drag system will give you enough power to get some moderately sized fish into the boat. It may not be top of the line, but it's a good budget option.

Pros
  • Great for trolling
  • Holds a ton of line
  • Accurate casting
  • Bent handle for torque
  • Includes levelwind
Cons
  • Shorter casting distance
  • Heavy reel

Quick Guide to Fishing Gear Ratio

  • Low Gear Ratio/Slow (5.1:1 thru 5.4:1)
    The lower gears are meant to be used for larger lures and slow-moving baits. Trawling for bass in the wintertime is a cinch with the lower gear speeds.
  • Medium Gear Ratio/Medium (6.1:1 thru 6.4:1)
    The middle speeds give anglers the advantages of both the faster and slower ratios. Medium gears are great for getting crankbaits and jigs bouncing through the water column.
  • High Gear Ratio/Fast (7.1:1 thru 8.1:1)
    Fast ratios are for moving lures quickly. Pulling a blade bait from the depths or a jerkbait across a long distance is what these ratios were made for.

Baitcasting Reel Size Guide

Manufacturers rate reel sizes with different numbers, so it’s easiest to concentrate on overall weight and line capacity. Most of the time, larger targets need heavier reels that can hold more line. Ultralight bass fishing is quickly gaining popularity, but it does involve longer fight times with largemouth bass. Lighter finesse lures for smaller targets like sunfish are best casted off light reels. Trout fishing will call for a light rod and reel as well. Some middleweight reels offer great stopping power in compact form.


How to Use a Baitcasting Reel

For all the dread people have of them, are baitcasters hard to use? As it turns out, using a baitcaster is pretty easy once you get the hang of it. First, you'll need to put the line on, like this:

  1. 1
    Feed your line through the hole or the levelwind.
  2. 2
    Run it through the holes in the spool and tie it off with a knot.
  3. 3
    Feed your line through the rod’s line guides.
  4. 4
    Turn the wheel backward until the spool is about ¾ full of line.

If you’re using a backing, you’ll have to repeat parts of this process twice. Casting is not as hard as it seems. Concentrate on using your thumb and finding out how the different settings work. A large part of fishing with a baitcaster is just getting a feel for it, and that takes time and practice.


Baitcasting Tips for Beginners

Here are some tips for newcomers who want to get the most out of their reel:

  • Start with your brakes set as tight as possible. You won't cast far, and casting won't be easy, but you need to learn the form first. Gradually reduce the brakes little by little while you practice.
  • The best places to fish are in cover, like submerged trees and vegetation.
  • Start with heavier lures because lighter finesse ones are much more finicky.
  • Learn what a bite feels like on the rod and when to pull back sharply to get a clean hook set.

People Also Ask (FAQs)

Are baitcasters hard to use?

Like everything in sport fishing, you’ll get the hang of it after a while. All you need is some patience and the right reel. You don’t need to learn on the most expensive baitcaster you can find. Once you can feel where the weight is going, the process will get much easier.

How do you use a baitcasting reel without backlash? What should I do to prevent backlash?

There are always some occasions when backlash occurs. But to minimize the chances, make sure your brakes are set correctly. If you're having trouble with backlash, tighten them up until you get a better feel for casting.

Make sure you have your settings arranged to suit the type of lure you're using as well. Lighter lures can get caught in the wind, and heavier ones can cause the line to go haywire if the brake system isn't tight enough. Pay attention to your thumb placement as well.

Can I use a left handed reel if I am right handed?

Many right-handed anglers use a left-handed reel to avoid having to switch the rod over to the other hand after they cast. Casting with the dominant hand is more comfortable for some, while other folks prefer just to learn how to cast with their left hand so they can continue to reel in with their right.

Who makes the best baitcasting reels?

No companies know what makes a good baitcasting reel like KastKing, Shimano, and Abu Garcia. Time and again, you'll find them getting rave reviews from anglers. Tournament fishers often have entire setups of five or six of the same baitcasters from these manufacturers, who are known for dependability, durability, and effective baitcasting reels.

What gear ratio would you recommend for a beginner?

Begin in the middle, perhaps in the 6.1:1 - 7.1:1 range. Most beginner reels fall in this range of ratios. Don't go any higher than a 7.3:1. It's easier to slow down a fast-moving lure on a reel with a high gear ratio than to crank the handle on a reel with a slower ratio repeatedly. However, beginners still need to learn how to move crankbaits and other lures through the water, which is best done in the middle range of gear ratios.

Are there any special care and maintenance steps for baitcasting reels?

Most baitcasters don’t require much day-to-day maintenance other than a quick cleaning after a fishing trip. Take the side plate off and make sure no dirt or grime has gotten inside. Clean with a damp rag.

There are lots of moving parts in a baitcaster, so make sure to apply some lubricant now and again. It's something you should do perhaps once or twice a season max. You can store a baitcaster quickly by leaving the line on the spool, a hook on the line, and fastening the hook.

How do I spool a braided line on a baitcaster?

You should use a mono backing to prevent slippage if you’re going to use braided line on a baitcaster. Tying a backing is the same as tying line onto the spool the normal way. Once the backing is on, you repeat the same steps but tie the braid to the mono backing with a secure knot.


Conclusion

Baitcasters are much more effective at involved fishing methods. Now that you’ve seen the best baitcasting reels under 100 dollars, you should have some idea of the drag power, durability, and line capacity a good baitcaster should have. For everything you need in a baitcaster, the KastKing Royale Legend Elite Series is the best budget baitcasting reel around.